2017-18 Academic Catalog

Department of Forestry

Forestry Major

Major Advisor: Dr. Stephen C. Grado
Office: 357 Thompson Hall

The Objective. The Forestry Major prepares its graduates for professional, science-based careers in the management and use of forested ecosystems. By combining courses offering a broad general education with specialized professional courses, the curriculum of the Forestry Major is designed to produce professionally competent graduates who have appropriate development in interpersonal relations, written and oral communications, cultural understanding, environmental awareness, and professional ethics.

Accreditation. Educational programs in the Forest Management, Wildlife Management, Urban Forestry, Environmental Conservation, and Forest Products concentrations lead to a professional degree in Forestry at Mississippi State University and are accredited by the Society of American Foresters (SAF). The Forest Products concentration is also accredited by the Society of Wood Science and Technology (SWST).

The Major. The core curriculum of the Forestry Major is comprised of specifically selected and intentionally designed courses which must be completed satisfactorily by each student who intends to graduate in this major. In addition to completing the core curriculum, each student must complete one of the five academic concentrations for specialized study offered by the Forestry Major. The five academic concentrations are Forest Management, Wildlife Management, Urban Forestry, Environmental Conservation, and Forest Products. Each concentration is an integral part of the Forestry Major and accredited by SAF. The Forest Products concentration is also accredited by SWST. Graduates of the major are qualified to become a Registered Forester in Mississippi after completing an examination for this purpose from the Board of Registration for Foresters in Mississippi.

The Forestry Major is designed for completion in four academic years which includes a nine-week Summer Field Program between the sophomore and junior years. The Summer Field Program contains many of the prerequisites needed to enroll in junior/senior level professional courses in the Forestry Major and students should plan their schedules accordingly. Correspondence courses are not accepted toward the forestry degree.

Transfer Students. Transfer students are encouraged to enter the Forestry Major at MSU by Spring semester of their sophomore year to complete their academic programs in the normal four-year period of study. Transfer students should be aware that course work taken elsewhere may not be accepted toward a degree in forestry. Only course work that is determined by the Forestry Department to be equivalent to required course work will be accepted. In addition, no course work will be considered for acceptance unless a grade of C or better has been earned.

Degree Requirements: In addition to General Education and College requirements, students must attain a minimum grade of C in Forestry major core courses listed in the CFR Undergraduate Handbook.

Natural Resource and Environmental Conservation Major

Major Advisor: Dr. Stephen C. Grado
Office: 357 Thompson Hall

The Objectives. The Natural Resource and Environmental Conservation major objectives are to prepare its graduates for professional careers by: 1) providing the broader general education fundamentals of written and oral communication; mathematics; biological, social, and physical sciences; and humanities which are critical to the development and advancement of well-qualified professionals; 2) providing both the relevant domains of knowledge and their application to the solution of real-world problems and achievement of defined objectives, including in-depth coverage of ecology and biology; measurement and evaluation of natural resource environmental components, properties, and functioning; management of ecosystems; and legal, regulatory, policy, and economic aspects of ecosystem administration and management; 3) establishing awareness of historical and current issues and policies affecting ecosystem management and conservation; and 4) providing a variety of educational experiences including lectures, discussion, simulations, computer applications, individual and group projects in laboratories and field experiences, and a capstone course teaching students to conduct environmental impact assessments.  The purpose of these experiences is to ensure that graduates of the program can knowledgeably develop, apply, facilitate, and/or execute natural resource and environmental management plans that adequately address matters of ownership/public goals and objectives, ecosystem health and sustainability, and the legal and regulatory environment.

The Major. The core curriculum of the Natural Resource and Environmental Conservation major is comprised of specifically selected and intentionally designed courses that provide students with a broad background in the science, technology, and social aspects of natural resource and environmental science. In addition to general education and major core requirements, students will complete one of three concentrations: Natural Resource Law and Administration, Resource Conservation Science, or Natural Resource Technology.

Transfer students. Transfer students are encouraged to enter the Natural Resource and Environmental Conservation major at MSU in the Spring semester of their sophomore year to complete their academic programs in the normal four-year period of study. Transfer students should be aware that course work taken elsewhere may not be accepted toward the degree. Only course work that is determined by the Department of Forestry to be equivalent to required course work will be accepted. In addition, no course work will be considered for acceptance unless a grade of C or better has been earned.

Degree Requirements. In addition to General Education and College requirements, students must attain a minimum grade of C on the Natural Resource and Environmental Conservation Major Core courses taught within the CFR.

Forestry 

General Education Requirements

English Composition
EN 1103English Composition I3
or EN 1163 Accelerated Composition I
EN 1113English Composition II3
or EN 1173 Accelerated Composition II
Mathematics
See concentration for requirements3
ST 2113Introduction to Statistics3
or BQA 2113 Business Statistical Methods I
Natural Science
CH 1043Survey of Chemistry I3
BIO 1134Biology I4
Humanities
See General Education courses6
Fine Arts
See General Education courses3
Social/Behavioral Sciences
FO 4113Forest Resource Economics 13
Choose one of the following:3
Introduction to Food and Resource Economics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Major Core 2
BIO 1144Biology II4
EPP 3124Forest Pest Management4
FO 1101Forest Resources Survey1
FO 2113Dendrology3
FO 2213Forest Measurements3
FO 3012Introduction to Forest Communities2
FO 3015Forest Description and Analysis5
FO 4123Forest Ecology3
FO 4213Forest Biometrics3
FO 4221Practice of Silviculture Laboratory1
FO 4223Practice of Silviculture3
FO 4231Introduction to Wood Supply Systems1
FO 4233Forest Operations and Harvesting3
FO 4313Spatial Technologies in Natural Resources Management3
FO 4323Forest Resource Management3
FO 4413Natural Resources Policy3
FO 4423Professional Practice3
PSS 3303Soils3
WFA 3031Introductory Wildlife/Fisheries Practices1
WFA 4153Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management3
Oral Communication Requirement
CO 1003Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
Computer Literacy Requirement
FO 3103Computer Application in Forest Resources3
Writing Requirement
Choose one of the following:3
Professional Writing in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Human Sciences
Organizational Communications
Professional Writing for Biologists
1

 This course is also part of the Major Core

2

Note: Prerequisites and co-requisites are strictly enforced in the College of Forest Resources. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of prerequisites and co-requisites for all courses required in his or her program; prerequisites and co-requisites are identified in the Course Description section of this Bulletin.

Choose one of the following concentrations:

Academic concentrations within the Forestry Major are offered to encourage the student to design a program with the assistance of a faculty advisor that will fit his or her interests and aptitudes. Each concentration has been constructed by substituting restricted, or in some cases directed, electives for what otherwise would appear as Business, Science, Free, or Professional electives in the major. Concentrations are intended to provide opportunities for the student to focus beyond the fundamental education provided by the core curriculum of the Forestry Major.

Forest Management Concentration (FOMG)

Advisor: Dr. Donald L. Grebner
Office: 329 Thompson Hall

The Forest Management Concentration provides the basic education necessary to enter the profession of forestry with the Bachelor of Science degree, yet permits a wide choice of electives. The student may elect courses in almost any subject of interest, if prerequisites are met; however, credit toward the degree will not be allowed for remedial courses, nor for courses covering substantially the same material as courses already passed, or covering only part of the subject matter of required courses.

Faculty advisors are assigned to assist students in selecting electives to meet their personal objectives. A program of study leading to a degree in forestry and a number of business minors are available.

Courses to be taken in addition to those in the core curriculum of the Forestry Major are as follows:

MA 1313College Algebra3
PH 1113General Physics I3
or PH 2213 Physics I
SBP 1103Introduction to Sustainable Bioproducts3
FO 3113Forest Recreation Management3
Business/Science Electives 19
Professional Electives 19
Free Elective3
Total Hours128
1

Professional electives and Business/Science electives are chosen from a list approved by the Department of Forestry.

Wildlife Management Concentration (WFMG)

Advisor: Dr. Emily B. Schultz
Office: 315 Thompson Hall

Undergraduate students who wish to prepare for careers in wildlife management may do so by completing the Wildlife Management Concentration of the Forestry Major. This concentration is designed for forestry students who intend to pursue careers that emphasize wildlife management within the context of multiple-use management of forest land. In addition, the Wildlife Management Concentration prepares the student for a number of wildlife management positions and fulfills the course requirements for certification as a Professional Wildlife Biologist by The Wildlife Society. Graduates of this concentration may undertake graduate studies in forestry or wildlife ecology and related areas.

Courses to be taken in addition to those in the core curriculum of the Forestry Major are as follows:

MA 1313College Algebra3
BIO 3524Biology of Vertebrates4
BIO 4203Taxonomy of Spermatophytes3
FO 4353Natural Resource Law3
WFA 3133Applied Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecology3
WFA 4243Wildlife Techniques3
WFA 4433Mammalogy3
WFA 4443Ornithology3
Professional Elective 13
Physical Science Elective3
Total Hours126
1

Professional electives are chosen from a list approved by the Department of Forestry.

Environmental Conservation Concentration (ENCO)

Advisor: Dr. Scott D. Roberts
Office: 351 Thompson Hall

The Envrionmental Conservation Concentration prepares students for careers dealing with complex environmental issues in the realm of forest resource management. Courses to be taken in addition to those in the core curriculum of the Forestry major are as follows:

MA 1313College Algebra3
PH 1113General Physics I3
or PH 2213 Physics I
WFA 3133Applied Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecology3
FO 3113Forest Recreation Management3
FO 4463Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management3
FO 4472
FO 4471
GIS for Natural Resource Management
and GIS for Natural Resource Management Lab
3
or FO 4453 Remote Sensing Applications
Emphasis Electives 114
Total Hours127
1

See Department Advisor for list of currently approved Emphasis Electives.

Urban Forestry Concentration (URBN)

Advisor: Dr. Stephen C. Grado
Office: 357 Thompson Hall

The Urban Forestry Concentration addresses an emerging need for the management of trees in towns and cities. Urban and community foresters manage trees along city streets, in municipal parks, private wood lots, and utility right-of-ways. Employers include federal, state, and municipal governments, private consultants, and industry.

Courses to be taken in addition to those in the core curriculum of the Forestry major are as follows:

MA 1313College Algebra (or equivalent)3
FO 3113Forest Recreation Management3
FO 4353Natural Resource Law3
FO 4471
FO 4472
GIS for Natural Resource Management Lab
and GIS for Natural Resource Management
3
or FO 4453 Remote Sensing Applications
LA 3623Urban Planning Theory3
FO 4453Remote Sensing Applications3
PS 1113American Government3
PSS 2423Plant Materials I3
PSS 4353Arboriculture and Landscape Maintenance3
REF 3333Principles of Real Estate3
REF 3433Real Property Evaluation3
Total Hours128

Forest Products Concentration (FP)

Advisor: Dr. Laura A. Grace
Office: 309 Thompson Hall

The Forest Products Concentration is designed for students interested in the forest products industry. Courses to be taken in addition to those in the core curriculum of the Forestry Major are as follows:

MA 1613Calculus for Business and Life Sciences I3
or MA 1713 Calculus I
CH 1053Survey of Chemistry II3
PH 1113General Physics I3
SBP 1103Introduction to Sustainable Bioproducts3
SBP 3113Biomaterial Phys Mech3
FP 4013Wood Anatomy3
FP Processing Elective 13
FP Electives 112
Total Hours128
1

See Departmental Advisor for list of current approved electives.

Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation

General Education Requirements

English
EN 1103English Composition I3
or EN 1163 Accelerated Composition I
EN 1113English Composition II3
or EN 1173 Accelerated Composition II
Fine Arts
LA 1803Landscape Architecture Appreciation3
Natural Sciences
BIO 1134Biology I4
BIO 1144Biology II4
GR 1114Elements of Physical Geography4
PSS 3303Soils3
PSS 3301Soils Laboratory1
Math
MA 1313College Algebra3
ST 2113Introduction to Statistics3
or ST 3123 Introduction to Statistical Inference
Humanities
PHI 1123Introduction to Ethics3
Any General Education Humanities course3
Social/Behavioral Sciences
AEC 2713Introduction to Food and Resource Economics3
or EC 2123 Principles of Microeconomics
SO 1003Introduction to Sociology3
Major Core
Chemistry - See Concentration for requirements
FO 1101Forest Resources Survey1
FO 2113Dendrology3
FO 3113Forest Recreation Management3
FO 4213Forest Biometrics3
FO 4313Spatial Technologies in Natural Resources Management3
FO 4343Forest Administration and Organization3
FO 4353Natural Resource Law3
FO 4413Natural Resources Policy3
GR 2313Maps and Remote Sensing3
NREC 3213Environmental Measurements3
NREC 4423Environmental Assessment3
WFA 3133Applied Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecology3
Oral Communication Requirement
CO 1003Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
or CO 1013 Introduction to Communication
Computer Literacy Requirement
FO 3103Computer Application in Forest Resources3
Writing Requirement
Choose one of the following:3
AELC 3203Professional Writing in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Human Sciences3
MGT 3213Organizational Communications3
BIO 3013Professional Writing for Biologists3
Concentration Courses - See Concentration Requirements38
Total Hours124

Natural Resource Law and Administration Concentration (NRLA)

Advisor: Dr. Changyou Sun
Office: 317 Thompson Hall

There are numerous laws, regulations, and policies affecting natural resource administration and management that have created a need for professionals with an understanding of the complex interactions between the science of managing natural resources and laws, regulations, policies, and processes involved in their utilization and protection. This Concentration will provide students with a background in the science of natural resource management as well as a foundation in the legal, regulatory, and administrative environment in which this management occurs.  Students completing this program will be prepared for post-graduate studies in law, public policy administration, and a wide range of natural resource disciplines, as well as employment with private and public organizations and agencies. 

Natural Resource Law and Administration Core Courses
CH 1043Survey of Chemistry I3
PHI 1113Introduction to Logic3
BL 2413The Legal Environment of Business3
PS 3063Constitutional Powers3
Professional Electives - See Department Advisor for list of approved electives20
Free Electives6
Total Concentration Hours38

Resource Conservation Science Concentration (RCS)

Advisor: Dr. Courtney M. Siegert
Office: 347 Thompson Hall

There is a need for expertise in resource conservation that relies on a science-based education and an understanding of effective applications of this knowledge to solve problems in natural resource settings.  This Concentration promotes learning and skill sets in resource conservation and science that will meet this objective. Universities and employers are looking for natural resource professionals who have the necessary tools to be able to attend graduate school or become employed by private organizations, private industry, and state and federal agencies whose primary mission is environmental protection and resource conservation. This is particularly important since these organizations and agencies are under increasing demands to document and verify their activities in both protecting natural resources (i.e., aquatic and terrestrial) and assessing impacts on human, floral, and faunal populations relying on these environments.

Resource Conservation Science Core Courses
MA 1713Calculus I3
or MA 1613 Calculus for Business and Life Sciences I
CH 1211Investigations in Chemistry I1
CH 1213Chemistry I3
CH 1221Investigations in Chemistry II1
CH 1223Chemistry II3
FO 4463Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management3
or FO 4483 Forest Soils
Emphasis Electives - Choose Terrestrial or Aquatic - See advisor for list of approved electives15
Professional Electives - See Department Advisor for list of approved electives6
Free Electives3
Total Concentration Hours38

Natural Resource Technology Concentration (NRT)

Advisor: Dr. David L. Evans
Office: 353 Thompson Hall

Modern protocols for natural resource monitoring and management are highly dependent on utilization of spatial technologies such as remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS). Spatial technologies and allied measurement and quantitative disciplines, combined with general knowledge needed for resource management, are essential  in public- and private-sector natural resource professions. Students will also be amply prepared to continue with graduate studies in this area. This Concentration is specifically designed to provide students with the fundamental background to meet the rapidly growing need for professionals who can collect, manage, and manipulate complex geospatial and ancillary data used in natural resource management.

Natural Resource Technology Core Courses
MA 1323Trigonometry3
CH 1043Survey of Chemistry I3
FO 2213Forest Measurements3
FO 4453Remote Sensing Applications3
FO 4471GIS for Natural Resource Management Lab1
FO 4472GIS for Natural Resource Management2
Professional Electives - See Department Advisor for list of approved elective20
Free Electives3
Total Concentration Hours38

Courses

FO 1001 First Year Seminar: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. First-year seminars explore a diverse arrary of topics that provide students with an opportunity to learn about a specific discipline from skilled faculty members

FO 1101 Forest Resources Survey: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. Survey of the professional resource manager's role and career opportunities in providing forest-based goods and services. Not open to Forest Resources majors with senior standing

FO 2113 Dendrology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: BIO 1144 or BIO 2113 or equivalent ). Two hours lecture. Four hours laboratory. Introduction to the identification and systematic classification of trees and other woody plants. Field exercises to promote the recognition and identification of trees and other woody plants

FO 2213 Forest Measurements: 3 hours.

(Prerequsite: ST 2113 or equivalent). Three hours lecture. Principles of measurement for standing and felled trees. Inventory and sampling theory for forested lands

FO 2443 Essentials of Biotechnology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. An introduction to principles and applications of biotechnology. (Same as CVM 2443)

FO 2990 Special Topics in Forestry: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

FO 3003 Internship in Forestry: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:Junior standing or consent of instructor). Professional work experience with firms or companies, non-governmental organizations, government agencies and other relevant entities

FO 3012 Introduction to Forest Communities: 2 hours.

(Prerequisites: PSS 3301, PSS 3303, FO 2113 ). Field exercises to gain practical knowledge of soil-geology-ecology interrelationships through trips to various physiographic regions

FO 3015 Forest Description and Analysis: 5 hours.

(Prerequisite: ST 2113 and FO 2213). Field and laboratory exercises to gain practical experience with forest and land measurement techniques and equipment. Mapping, inventory, and analysis of forested tracts

FO 3103 Computer Application in Forest Resources: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Three hours of courses in the College of Forest Resources or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Application of computer concepts in forest resources with emphasis in forestry. Practice and demonstration of general and professional software packages used in upper level courses and professional settings

FO 3113 Forest Recreation Management: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Studies of the management of forest resources for outdoor recreation

FO 3203 Forest Fire: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. Basic aspects of fire history, fire behavior, fire weather, fire effects, and management of fire. Emphasis on the use of prescribed burning in forest management

FO 3213 Tree Physiology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: BIO 1134 and BIO 1144). Three hours lecture. Physiological principles (photosynthesis, water relations and nutrient uptake) in the context of the unique physical attributes of trees including their large multi-dimensional crowns, long distance transport systems, woody stems, and longevity

FO 4000 Directed Individual Study in Forestry: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

FO 4113 Forest Resource Economics: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: AEC 2713 or equivalent). Three hours lecture. Basic principles of forest resource valuation; economics applied to production, conversion, marketing and consumption of forest products and benefits

FO 4123 Forest Ecology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 3012). Three hours lecture. Four hours laboratory. Natural principles governing establishment, development, and functioning of forest ecosystems. Includes ecology, genetics, physiology, tree growth, reproduction, site, stand dynamics, energetics, hydrology, nutrition, and succession

FO 4213 Forest Biometrics: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ST 2113 or equivalent or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Applications of mensurational and statistical principles and techniques in determination of forest growth and yield. Advanced topics of forest resource inventory

FO 4221 Practice of Silviculture Laboratory: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: FO 4123/6123 or WF 4223; co-requisite: FO 4223/6223). Four hours laboratory. Application of silvicultural practices and operations under given forest land management objectives

FO 4223 Practice of Silviculture: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 4123/6123, FO 4121/6121 or WF 3133 and WF 4223; co-requisite: FO 4221/6221). Three hours lecture. Manipulation to obtain desired reproduction and to attain optimum development under given forest land management objectives

FO 4231 Introduction to Wood Supply Systems: 1 hour.

(Co-requisite: FO 3015). Investigative field and laboratory exercises used to gain practical knowledge into the structure and performance of wood supply systems

FO 4233 Forest Operations and Harvesting: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: FO 3015, FO 4231/6231, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Study of practical, managerial, and logistic considerations associated with harvesting and other forest operations, as well as their social, environmental, and legal influences

FO 4253 Timber Procurement: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: FO 4231/6231, FO 4233/6233). Lectures and field exercises dealing with the problems of timber procurement to include planning for harvest, methods of handling and transport, legal and safety considerations

FO 4313 Spatial Technologies in Natural Resources Management: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 3015 or GR 2313 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory.Fundamentals of scale, area, height, and stand volume determinations from aerial imagery; planimetric and topographic mapping; image interpretation; GPS and GIS; applications to natural resources

FO 4323 Forest Resource Management: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: FO 4113/6113, FO 4223/6223, FO 4233/6233, FO 4231/6231, FO 4213/6213). Three hours lecture.Three hours laboratory Application of quantitative decision making techniques to to stand-level and forest -wide management problems. Topics include land classification, forest production, optimal rotation analyssi, and harvest scheduling

FO 4343 Forest Administration and Organization: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor consent). Three hours lecture. Hierarchy and land structuring of forest organizations. Legal aspects of administering forest land holdings

FO 4353 Natural Resource Law: 3 hours.

(Perquisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A comprehensive study of the laws relating to natural resources and forestry with emphasis on tort law, real property law, environmental law, taxation law and contract law

FO 4411 Remote Sensing Seminar: 1 hour.

(Prerequisites: Junior Standing). One hour lecture. Lectures by remote sensing experts from industry, academia, and governmental agencies on next-generation systems, applications, and economic and societal impact of remote sensing. May be repeated for credit up to four credits. (Same as PSS 4411/6411, ECE4411/6411, GR 4411/6411)

FO 4413 Natural Resources Policy: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing). Three hours lecture. Current topics relating to natural resources policy which affect management decisions and practices in the public and private sectors of natural resources use

FO 4423 Professional Practice: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 4323/6323) Three hours lecture. Four hours laboratory. Forest resource data collection and analysis. Development of forest resource alternatives and recommendations for a specific forest property

FO 4443 International Forest Resources and Trade: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A study of the world's wood consumption, marketing arrangements, community forestry, and forestry in economic development

FO 4453 Remote Sensing Applications: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: A basic image interpretation or mote sensing course or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. An introduction to remote sensing with emphasis on analysis and application of digital image data in inventory, monitoring, and management of renewable natural resources

FO 4463 Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: PSS 3303, FO 3012, FO 4123/6123, FO 4121/6121, or consent of instructor).Three hours lecture. Synthesis of current information on the fundamental properties and processes of forest soils, hydrology, and water quality with emphasis on watershed and ecosystem management factors

FO 4471 GIS for Natural Resource Management Lab: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; Co-requisite: FO 4472/6472). Three hours laboratory. Computer laboratory exercises that stress development, management, and use of digital geographical data for management of natural resources. management of natural resources

FO 4472 GIS for Natural Resource Management: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; Co-requisite: FO 4471/6471). Two hours lecture. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on collection, encoding, storage, retrieval, and analysis of spatial data for use in management of natural resources

FO 4483 Forest Soils: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: PSS 3303, FO 3012, FO 4123/6123, FO 4121/6121, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Synthesize current information on fundamental properties and processes of forest soils with emphasis on applications to silviculture, soil conservation, and sustainable management of forested ecosystems

FO 4513 Forestry and Conservation for Educators.: 3 hours.

(Two hours lecture; two hours lab). Importance of forestry and natural resources conservation, application of forestry and conservation principles and practices to educational settings. For non-forestry majors

FO 4573 Ecology of Managed Forests: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing, upper-level FO undergraduate student, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Examination of the ecological factors that influence silvicultural practice in North America

FO 4663 Consulting Forestry: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO major, senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Review of business, legal, and economic issues integral to applying the science of forestry as a service based enterprise

FO 4683 Introduction to Urban and Community Forestry: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Addresses urban forest management issues and opportunities as well as educational extension/outreach program strategies within the urban forest context

FO 4771 Seeing the Forest for the Trees: A Career Exploration: 1 hour.

One hour lecture plus laboratory experience. A course for upper-level, non-Forestry majors providing an overview of forest management, wood products, manufacturing facilities, and career opportunities for non-foresters

FO 4990 Special Topics in Forestry: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

FO 6113 Forest Resource Economics: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: AEC 2713 or equivalent). Three hours lecture. Basic principles of forest resource valuation; economics applied to production, conversion, marketing and consumption of forest products and benefits

FO 6123 Forest Ecology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 3012). Three hours lecture. Four hours laboratory. Natural principles governing establishment, development, and functioning of forest ecosystems. Includes ecology, genetics, physiology, tree growth, reproduction, site, stand dynamics, energetics, hydrology, nutrition, and succession

FO 6213 Forest Biometrics: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ST 2113 or equivalent or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Applications of mensurational and statistical principles and techniques in determination of forest growth and yield. Advanced topics of forest resource inventory

FO 6221 Practice of Silviculture Laboratory: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: FO 4123/6123 or WF 4223; co-requisite: FO 4223/6223). Four hours laboratory. Application of silvicultural practices and operations under given forest land management objectives

FO 6223 Practice of Silviculture: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 4123/6123, FO 4121/6121 or WF 3133 and WF 4223; co-requisite: FO 4221/6221). Three hours lecture. Manipulation to obtain desired reproduction and to attain optimum development under given forest land management objectives

FO 6231 Introduction to Wood Supply Systems: 1 hour.

(Co-requisite: FO 3015). Investigative field and laboratory exercises used to gain practical knowledge into the structure and performance of wood supply systems

FO 6233 Forest Operations and Harvesting: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: FO 3015, FO 4231/6231, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Study of practical, managerial, and logistic considerations associated with harvesting and other forest operations, as well as their social, environmental, and legal influences

FO 6253 Timber Procurement: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: FO 4231/6231, FO 4233/6233). Lectures and field exercises dealing with the problems of timber procurement to include planning for harvest, methods of handling and transport, legal and safety considerations

FO 6313 Spatial Technologies in Natural Resources Management: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 3015 or GR 2313 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory.Fundamentals of scale, area, height, and stand volume determinations from aerial imagery; planimetric and topographic mapping; image interpretation; GPS and GIS; applications to natural resources

FO 6323 Forest Resource Management: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: FO 4113/6113, FO 4223/6223, FO 4233/6233, FO 4231/6231, FO 4213/6213). Three hours lecture.Three hours laboratory Application of quantitative decision making techniques to to stand-level and forest -wide management problems. Topics include land classification, forest production, optimal rotation analyssi, and harvest scheduling

FO 6353 Natural Resource Law: 3 hours.

(Perquisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A comprehensive study of the laws relating to natural resources and forestry with emphasis on tort law, real property law, environmental law, taxation law and contract law

FO 6411 Remote Sensing Seminar: 1 hour.

(Prerequisites: Junior Standing). One hour lecture. Lectures by remote sensing experts from industry, academia, and governmental agencies on next-generation systems, applications, and economic and societal impact of remote sensing. May be repeated for credit up to four credits. (Same as PSS 4411/6411, ECE4411/6411, GR 4411/6411)

FO 6413 Natural Resources Policy: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing). Three hours lecture. Current topics relating to natural resources policy which affect management decisions and practices in the public and private sectors of natural resources use

FO 6423 Professional Practice: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 4323/6323) Three hours lecture. Four hours laboratory. Forest resource data collection and analysis. Development of forest resource alternatives and recommendations for a specific forest property

FO 6443 International Forest Resources and Trade: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A study of the world's wood consumption, marketing arrangements, community forestry, and forestry in economic development

FO 6453 Remote Sensing Applications: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: A basic image interpretation or mote sensing course or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. An introduction to remote sensing with emphasis on analysis and application of digital image data in inventory, monitoring, and management of renewable natural resources

FO 6463 Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: PSS 3303, FO 3012, FO 4123/6123, FO 4121/6121, or consent of instructor).Three hours lecture. Synthesis of current information on the fundamental properties and processes of forest soils, hydrology, and water quality with emphasis on watershed and ecosystem management factors

FO 6471 GIS for Natural Resource Management Lab: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; Co-requisite: FO 4472/6472). Three hours laboratory. Computer laboratory exercises that stress development, management, and use of digital geographical data for management of natural resources. management of natural resources

FO 6472 GIS for Natural Resource Management: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; Co-requisite: FO 4471/6471). Two hours lecture. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on collection, encoding, storage, retrieval, and analysis of spatial data for use in management of natural resources

FO 6483 Forest Soils: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: PSS 3303, FO 3012, FO 4123/6123, FO 4121/6121, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Synthesize current information on fundamental properties and processes of forest soils with emphasis on applications to silviculture, soil conservation, and sustainable management of forested ecosystems

FO 6513 Forestry and Conservation for Educators: 3 hours.

(Two hours lecture; two hours lab). Importance of forestry and natural resources conservation, application of forestry and conservation principles and practices to educational settings. For non-forestry majors

FO 6573 Ecology of Managed Forests: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing, upper-level FO undergraduate student, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Examination of the ecological factors that influence silvicultural practice in North America

FO 6663 Consulting Forestry: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO major, senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Review of business, legal, and economic issues integral to applying the science of forestry as a service based enterprise

FO 6683 Introduction to Urban and Community Forestry: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Addresses urban forest management issues and opportunities as well as educational extension/outreach program strategies within the urban forest context

FO 6990 Special Topics in Forestry: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

FO 7000 Directed Individual Study in Forestry: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

FO 8000 Thesis Research/ Thesis in Forestry: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

FO 8111 Graduate Seminar: 1 hour.

Credit in 2 semesters allowed. Review of and discussion of current forestry issues. Presentation of student reports

FO 8143 Advanced Forest Economics: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Application of current theory and techniques of economics to forestry. Emphasis is on the use of quantitative tools to improve decision-making in forest resource management

FO 8153 Quantitative Forest Ecology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: MA 1723 and ST 8114 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Analytical models, fitting model coefficients to data, life tables, spatial patterns, interspecific competition, and species diversity

FO 8163 Nonmarket Forest Values: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 4113 or equivalent or consent of instructor). The course will deal with the valuation or nonmarket, non-timber outputs or amenities derived from the forest

FO 8173 Advanced Spatial Technologies: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: an introductory course in remote sensing and/or geographical information systems or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Group discussion and application of integrated remote sending, image analysis and GIS software tools for assessment of natural resources

FO 8211 Graduate Seminar: 1 hour.

Credit in 2 semesters allowed. Review of and discussion of current forestry issues. Presentation of student reports

FO 8213 Advanced Silviculture: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 4223 or consent of instructor). Three hours of lecture and/or field trips once per week. Spring semester. Silvicultural practices in context of the total ecological principles in decision making process. Emphasis on silviculture of bottomland hardwoods

FO 8233 Advanced Forest Inventory: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Design and analysis of forest resource inventories. Growth functions, yield tables, measures of site quality and stocking, and advanced sampling topics

FO 8243 Advanced Forest Resource Management and Planning: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: FO 8143). Three hours lecture. Emphasis is on the assessment of multiple-use alternatives. Data needs, resource trade-offs, and economic and policy implications are discussed

FO 8293 Professional Paper: 3 hours.

(For Master of Science non-thesis option students only). Demonstration of ability to compile, synthesize, and evaluate information, and to effectively communicate analyses and conclusions

FO 8313 Spatial Statistics for Natural Resources: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:ST 4313/6313, and an introductory GIS course, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Concepts and methods of spatial statistics as applied to natural resource monitoring and management

FO 8353 Ecological Modeling in Natural Resources: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: ST 8114 or ST 8253 or equivalent).Three hours lecture.This course introduces the concepts and methods of ecological modeling as applied to natural resources monitoring and management

FO 8443 International Forest Resources and Trade: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A study of the world's wood consumption, marketing arrangements, dynamics of deforestation, agroforestry and community forestry, country specific forestry issues, and forestry in economic development

FO 8571 Emerging Issues in Forest Ecosystems: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor). One hour seminar. Overview of the major biological, ecological, and socio-economic issues facing forest conservation

FO 8673 Planning and Evaluation in Natural Resources Outreach Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Presents methods for needs assessment of forestry extension/outreach education, development of programs to meet client needs, and evaluation of the effectiveness of such programs

FO 8961 Nobel Topics in Physiology/Medicine and Chemistry: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor). One hour seminar. The course will provide historic and current understanding of topics awarded with a Nobel Prize. (Same as CVM 8961 and GNS 8961). May be repeated three times for credit

FO 8973 Scientific Writing: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor) Three hours lecture. The course provides advanced training in research proposal, grant proposal,and manuscript writing. (Same as ADS 8973 and CVM 8973)

FO 8983 Advanced Biotechnology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:BCH 6603,BCH 6613,BCH 6713 or consent of instructor).Three house lecture. Advanced biotechnology course with an emphasis on environmental,biopharmaceutical,industrial, and medical technologies.(Same as CVM 8983)

FO 8990 Special Topics in Forestry: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

FO 9000 Dissertation Research/Dissertation in Forestry: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

NREC 3213 Environmental Measurements: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. Principles of inventory, sampling and analysis for measurements in environmental assessments. Field exercises provide practice in sampling methods, data collection, instrumentation, and analysis

NREC 4423 Environmental Assessment: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:NREC senior level standing or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Principles of assessing environmental impacts resulting from planned management activities affecting natural resources. Preparation of Environmental Impact Statements (EIS)