2016-17 Academic Catalog

Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures

Undergraduate Coordinator: Dr. Jimmy Hardin
Office: 209 Cobb Institute of Archaeology

Anthropology is the study of humans as biological and cultural beings. Its subfields include archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. Students majoring in anthropology may undertake course work in all four subfields, with concentrations offered in archaeology and cultural and biological anthropology.

Anthropology is a particularly broad major, designed for students who are preparing for employment with research organizations or museums, for administrative and research positions with state or federal governments (such as state highway departments and the National Park Service), and with human service agencies or organizations that involve work in foreign countries. The undergraduate major in anthropology also prepares students for graduate training in professional fields such as planning, law, and public administration, as well as for graduate training in anthropology leading to college and university teaching and research positions.

A student wishing to pursue a program leading to a Bachelor of Arts with a major in anthropology is required to complete the program of study outlined on this page. Students are encouraged to take elective courses in related fields which will strengthen their academic training and job skills. These may include courses in human anatomy, soils, geology, and geographic information systems (GIS).

Students are eligible for membership in the Alpha chapter of Lambda Alpha, the national anthropology honorary. In order to be considered, a student must have at least a 2.50 overall GPA, with a 3.00 GPA in anthropology courses, and have earned a minimum of 12 semester hours credit in anthropology. Part-time jobs are available for anthropology majors through the Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures and through the Cobb Institute of Archaeology.

The Anthropology faculty and staff are housed in the Cobb Institute of Archaeology. Facilities include archaeology laboratories and museum. The museum houses artifacts from Mississippi and the Middle East, including replicas of large-scale relief sculptures and statues from Assyria and Egypt.

Anthropology may be used as a minor field of study at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Fifteen hours (nine hours must be 3000 level or above), including AN 1103, constitute an undergraduate minor. Requirements for an anthropology minor at the graduate level will be established in consultation with the anthropology graduate advisor. Courses taken for an undergraduate or graduate minor must be taught by anthropology faculty.

General Education and College Requirements

English Composition
EN 1103English Composition I3
or EN 1163 Accelerated Composition I
EN 1113English Composition II3
or EN 1173 Accelerated Composition II
Foreign Language
3 semestersone Foreign Language - see advisor9
Humanities
Literaturesee General Education courses3
Historysee General Education courses3
PhilosophySee A&S requirements3
Humanities ElectiveConsult Advisor. Must be from 2 different areas - see A&S Core9
Mathematics
MA 1313College Algebra3
MA /ST 2113Introduction to Statistics3
Fine Arts
See A&S Core List3
Natural Sciences
Physical Sciences w/lab (CH, GG, PH) 13-4
Life Science w/ lab (BIO)3-4
Natural Science Elective 23-4
Social Sciences
See General Education courses6
Social Sciences Electives 312
Major Core
AN 1143Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
AN 1344Introduction to Biological Anthropology4
AN 1543Introduction to Archaeology3
Anthropology Upper Div Electives - see advisor18
Anthropology Lower or Upper Division Elective2
Oral Communication Requirement
AN 4123Anthropological Theory3
Writing Requirement
AN 4123Anthropological Theory3
Computer Literacy
AN 4143Ethnographic Methods3
or AN 3513 Artifact Analysis
General Electives
General Electives - Consult advisor15-24
Total Hours 124

 Note: Minimum hours required is 123 but based on electives chosen more hours may be taken.

1

See General Education courses.

2

Consult advisor.

3

Must be from 2 different areas and must cross 4 disciplines over the 18 hours. Only one Economics allowed. Two Anthropology courses may be included. Consult advisor.

Middle Eastern Studies Minor

The Middle Eastern Studies (MES) minor is offered to MSU students as formal acknowledgement of the completion of a specialized program of study over and above their normal degree requirements that leads to greater proficiency in areas related to Middle Eastern Studies. The MES minor requires a minimum of 18 credit hours. Students must complete at least 9 hours (3 courses) from the Core Course List, and 9 hours (3 courses) from the Elective Course List. Only one Special Topics (2990, 4990) or Directed Individual Study (4000) in Middle Eastern Cultures, Religion, or Anthropology will be accepted for completion of this minor.

Students must choose three of the following:9
Near Eastern Archaeology
Near Eastern Archaeology
Near Eastern Archaeology
The Ancient Near East
The Ancient Near East
The Ancient Near East
Ancient Greece and Rome
Islam
Islam
MEC 4000
Directed Individual Study 1
Students must select three of the following:9
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Rise of Civilization
Near Eastern Archaeology
Near Eastern Archaeology
Near Eastern Archaeology
Archaeological Travel and Participation Program
Greek I
Elementary Ancient Greek II
Latin I
Latin II
Geography of Islamic World
The Ancient Near East
The Ancient Near East
The Ancient Near East
Ancient Greece and Rome
Islam
Islam
Introduction to the Old Testament
Introduction to the New Testament
Introduction to Old Testament Archaeology
Introduction to Old Testament Archaeology
The Prophets of Ancient Israel
Classical Mythology
Classical Mythology
Total Hours18
1

 May use only one Directed Individual Study/Special Topic. This also includes AN/REL 2990, 4000, and 4990.

Anthropology Courses

AN 1001 First Year Seminar: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. First-year seminars explore a diverse arrary of topics that provide students with an opportunity to learn about a specific discipline from skilled faculty members

AN 1103 Introduction to Anthropology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. The fields, theories, and methods of anthropology; man's biological and cultural development; survey of technological, economic, political, social, religious, and linguistic systems

AN 1143 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Introduction to the study of social, political, and economic organization, magic and religion, personality, and art

AN 1173 Introduction to Gender Studies: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. An introduction to theoretical concepts in Gender Studies. This course will examine the influence of the women's movement on the academic development of Gender Studies. (Same as GS 1173 and SO 1173)

AN 1344 Introduction to Biological Anthropology: 4 hours.

Three hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Biology of evolution, mechanism of speciation, concepts of race, and the primate order are explored culminating in an appreciation of paleoanthropology, human evolution, and human variation

AN 1543 Introduction to Archaeology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A survey of early cultural development throughout the world; emphasis on archaeological techniques, interpretations and theories of development

AN 2103 Nutritional Anthropology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Discussion of human diet and nutrition from holistic, cross-cultural perspective. Topics covered include evolution of human diet, nutrition and subsistence transitions; health, growth, and disease; food insecurity; and food in relation to economy, identity, religion, and senses

AN 2203 Cultural and Racial Minorities: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Three hours in an introductory social science). Three hours lecture. Origins of minority groups and racial attitudes. Biological and cultural concepts of race and minority groups; problems of adjustment in interracial and multiethnic societies. (same as AAS 2003 and SO 2203)

AN 2403 Introduction to the Study of Language: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Students will be introduced to the subfields of linguistics to answer questions they have about language and to provide evidence about language acquisition and use. (Same as EN 2403)

AN 2510 Archaeological Field Methods: Survey: 1-6 hours.

Credit to be arranged. Archaeological surface survey methods in field setting, including map-reading, shovel- testing, collection techniques, controlled surface collection, artifact recognition

AN 2990 Special Topics in Anthropology: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

AN 3113 Societies of the World: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103 or its equivalent or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A survey of principal culture types and their distribution

AN 3123 North American Indians: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Ethnographic survey of the Indians of North and Mesoamerica

AN 3133 Anthropology of Latin America: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A survey of societies in Latin America with an emphasis on indigenous peoples, their relationship to contemporary social and economic development

AN 3163 Maritime & Fishing People: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Introduction to the anthropological investigation of maritime and fishing people. The course explores: cultural adaptations to maritime existence, the history of seafaring, characteristics of maritime peoples, overfishing, and fisheries economics, management and sustainability

AN 3193 African Cultures: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103 or AN 1143 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Course provides a study of sub-Saharan African cultures, including diverse social, political organization, gender roles, and culture change. (Same as AAS 3193)

AN 3323 Contemporary Woman: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Introductory course for the Concentration in Women's Studies. Major topics are women's heritage, identity, culture, and vulnerabilities. (Same as SO 3323)

AN 3333 Primate Behavior: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. In-depth study of non-human primate evolution, social behavior, and communication. Field studies and conservation efforts will be examined

AN 3343 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Examination of the foundations and role of forensic anthropology in the forensic sciences. Review of the biological profile, assessment of bone trauma, identification of taphonomic agents, and an exploration of mass disasters and human rights violations

AN 3510 Archaeological Field Methods: Excavation: 1-6 hours.

Credit to be arranged. Excavation methods in field setting, including mapping, recording, recovery and proveniencing techniques, field research strategies

AN 3513 Artifact Analysis: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Introduction to artifact recognition and analysis, focusing on prehistoric and historic creamics, stone tools and debris, glass, nails, animal bones, shell, and environmental indicators

AN 3523 North American Archaeology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A survey of the prehistoric cultures of North America including the influences of the high civilizations of Mesoamerica

AN 3533 Rise of Civilization: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103 or HI 1213). Three hours lecture. Survey of prehistoric cultures and their contributions to the rise of civilizations in Latin America, China, Africa, India and the Middle East

AN 3540 Archaeological Travel and Participation Program: 1-6 hours.

Participation in excavations in the Near East and related lecture programs. (Same as MEC 3540 and REL 3540)

AN 3553 Near Eastern Archaeology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Introduction to the contributions made by archaeological research to ancient Near Eastern history and prehistory, with special emphasis on the Syro-Palestinian area. (Same as MEC 3553 and REL 3553)

AN 4000 Directed Individual Study in Anthropology: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

AN 4123 Anthropological Theory: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103 or its equivalent or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A history of the development of anthropological theory; an analysis of contemporary theoretical formulations and approaches

AN 4133 Medical Anthropology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. The cross-cultural study of health, sickness, and medicine from a holistic perspective emphasizing in- teractions between culture and biology and between bio- medicine and local healing traditions

AN 4143 Ethnographic Methods: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: AN 1103 or AN 1143 or consent of instructor.) Three hours lecture. An overview of methods and techniques for conducting ethnographic research

AN 4163 Anthropology of International Development: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Role of anthropology in international development including origins of the Third World, development theory, current issues in international development, case studies

AN 4173 Environment and Society: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103, SO 1003 consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A study of the interaction between human society and the environment including the social aspects of environmental problems. (Same as SO 4173/6173)

AN 4303 Human Variation and Origins: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. An examination of human origins, genetics, and other principal factors that contribute to physical variation within and between human populations

AN 4313 Human Osteology: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Identification of each human bone both complete and fragmentary. Study of skeletal and dental development, sex differences, age changes, hard tissue histology, and paleopathology

AN 4323 Plagues and People: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Discussion of the impact of epidemic infectious diseases, such as the Black Death, syphilis, and HIV/AIDS, on human societies throughout history

AN 4403 Introduction to Linguistics: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. The descriptive and historical study of language; linguistic analysis and comparison; language classification; language in its social and cultural setting. (Same as EN 4403/6403)

AN 4523 Public Archaeology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1543 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Survey of cultural resource management practices, Federal and State historic preservation laws, research proposal design, significance assessments, professional ethics, employee/client relationships, and public education

AN 4623 Language and Culture: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Examination of language as a part of culture, a source of knowledge about other aspects of culture, and a social behavior. (Same as EN 4623/6623 and SO 4623/6623)

AN 4633 Language and Society: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Examination of relationship between language and society, and how, when, and why people in speech communities use language varieties. (Same as EN 4633/6633 and SO 4633/6633)

AN 4990 Special Topics in Anthropology: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

AN 6123 Anthropological Theory: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103 or its equivalent or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A history of the development of anthropological theory; an analysis of contemporary theoretical formulations and approaches

AN 6133 Medical Anthropology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. The cross-cultural study of health, sickness, and medicine from a holistic perspective emphasizing in- teractions between culture and biology and between bio- medicine and local healing traditions

AN 6143 Ethnographic Methods: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: AN 1103 or AN 1143 or consent of instructor.) Three hours lecture. An overview of methods and techniques for conducting ethnographic research

AN 6163 Anthropology of International Development: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Role of anthropology in international development including origins of the Third World, development theory, current issues in international development, case studies

AN 6173 Environment and Society: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1103, SO 1003 consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A study of the interaction between human society and the environment including the social aspects of environmental problems. (Same as SO 4173/6173)

AN 6303 Human Variation and Origins: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. An examination of human origins, genetics, and other principal factors that contribute to physical variation within and between human populations

AN 6313 Human Osteology: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Identification of each human bone both complete and fragmentary. Study of skeletal and dental development, sex differences, age changes, hard tissue histology, and paleopathology

AN 6323 Plagues and People: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Discussion of the impact of epidemic infectious diseases, such as the Black Death, syphilis, and HIV/AIDS, on human societies throughout history

AN 6403 Introduction to Linguistics: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. The descriptive and historical study of language; linguistic analysis and comparison; language classification; language in its social and cultural setting. (Same as EN 4403/6403)

AN 6523 Public Archaeology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: AN 1543 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Survey of cultural resource management practices, Federal and State historic preservation laws, research proposal design, significance assessments, professional ethics, employee/client relationships, and public education

AN 6623 Language and Culture: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Examination of language as a part of culture, a source of knowledge about other aspects of culture, and a social behavior. (Same as EN 4623/6623 and SO 4623/6623)

AN 6633 Language and Society: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Examination of relationship between language and society, and how, when, and why people in speech communities use language varieties. (Same as EN 4633/6633 and SO 4633/6633)

AN 6990 Special Topics in Anthropology: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

AN 7000 Directed Individual Study in Anthropology: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

AN 8000 Thesis Research/ Thesis in Anthropology: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

AN 8011 Professionalization in Applied Anthropology: 1 hour.

One hour seminar. Students are introduced to norms of professional behavior in Applied Anthropology, with focus on success in graduate school and preparation for the job market

AN 8013 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology: 3 hours.

Students are introduced to quantitative methods utilized in anthropological research. Students will examine anthropological research design, sampling strategies, probability theory, and various statistical approaches

AN 8103 Applied Cultural Anthropology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: AN 1103 or AN 1143 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. An overview of the application of anthropological theory and method of contemporary social problems

AN 8123 Environmental Anthropology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: None). Three hours seminar. Study of anthropological approaches to analyzing the relationship between humans and the environment

AN 8193 Current Cultural Theory: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: None). Three hours seminar. The study of contemporary theoretical perspectives and problems in cultural anthropology

AN 8215 Internship in Applied Anthropology: 5 hours.

A minimum of nine wkked of supervised professional anthropology experience in an appropriate setting

AN 8303 Seminar in Bio-archaeology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Overview of applications in bioarchaeology, including paleodemography, paleopathology, and paleonutrition

AN 8313 Paleopathology: Ancient Disease: 3 hours.

Three hours seminar. Seminar on theory and methods for reconstructing the history of human health and disease from skeletal, archaeological, biomolecular, and historical material

AN 8513 Southeastern Archaeology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Prehistory of Southeastern U.S. from entry of first people to European contact. Changes in technology, settlement, subsistence, demography, and environment examined using archaeological evidence

AN 8523 Environmental Archaeology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Coverage of method and theory in environmental archaeology, including elements of palynology, geoarchaeology, floral and faunal analysis, landscape ecology, historical ecology, cultural ecology, and taphonomy

AN 8533 Readings in Archaeology: Theory: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Archaeological theory and its implications for practice, focusing on evolutionary archaeology but also including culture history, processual, reconstructionist, and post-processual approaches

AN 8543 Household Archaeology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Explores inner-workings of societies through the archaeological investigation of households globally. Reviews household universality, composition, function and variation. Considers theoretical, methodological, and substantive issues

AN 8553 Readings in Archaeology: Applications: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Review of literature related to materials science in archaeology, including thin-sectioning and petrography, raw material sourcing, organic residues, dating techniques, and preservation technnology

AN 8990 Special Topics in Anthropology: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

Middle Eastern Culture Courses

MEC 2233 Introduction to Old Testament Archaeology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A survey of the Old Testament in the light of archaeological research. This approach is chronological-historical-archaeological. (Same as REL 2233)

MEC 3473 Islam: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A survey of Islamic history, beliefs and practices, law, theology, philosophy and mysticism. (Same as REL 3473)

MEC 3540 Archaeological Travel and Participation Program: 1-6 hours.

Participation in excavations in the Near East and related lecture program. (Same as AN 3540 and REL 3540)

MEC 3553 Near Eastern Archaeology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Introduction to the contributions made by archaeological research to ancient Near Eastern history and prehistory, with special emphasis on the Syro-Palestinian area. (Same as AN 3553 and REL 3553)

MEC 4403 The Ancient Near East: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A study of the origins and development of civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Syria-Palestine from prehistoric times to the end of the Persian period. (Same as HI 4403/6403 and REL 4403/6403)

MEC 6403 The Ancient Near East: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A study of the origins and development of civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Syria-Palestine from prehistoric times to the end of the Persian period. (Same as HI 4403/6403 and REL 4403/6403)