2017-18 Academic Catalog

School of Architecture

Director: Michael A. Berk
Academic Records Assistant: Pandora Prater
Academic Advising: Laura Mitchell
Office: 240 Giles Hall

General Information

The profession of architecture offers the student the opportunity to participate in improving the physical world, in solving problems of our society, and in giving form to the needs of modern culture. To meet these demands requires a highly trained profession composed of sensitive, dedicated men and women. The School of Architecture is the educational foundation of the profession in the State of Mississippi and provides for the development of the skills and understanding to prepare the student for his or her role in the practice of architecture.

The School of Architecture offers an intense, carefully structured, and rich array of courses which constitute a solid foundation for architectural practice. The course work provides students with an awareness of the diversity and complexity of today’s professional world. Each course has its own important role in developing the knowledge, collaborative skills, and abilities required of architects in a contemporary practice.

The School of Architecture at Mississippi State University is the professional school for the State of Mississippi and is the only program in the state that leads to a professional degree in architecture. To meet the needs of the state and region, the School was established in 1973 with the support of an Advisory Committee of the Mississippi Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

Accreditation

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted an eight-year, a three-year, or a two-year term of accreditation, depending on the degree and quality of its conformance with established educational standards.

The Bachelor of Architecture program at the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University has been continuously accredited since its inception. In 2016 the School was reaccredited for another full eight-year term.

Admissions

Admission to the School of Architecture is limited and highly competitive. Prospective students should carefully read materials on the School web site and communicate with the School of Architecture to request current information, and if possible, arrange for a tour of facilities and admissions advisement.

Application Process

  1. Apply to Mississippi State University.
  2. Submit all required materials including high school transcripts and ACT or SAT scores
  3. Indicate your choice of major as “Architecture.”
  4. Once admitted to MSU, complete the School of Architecture application online which can be found on the applicant's my.msstate.edu homepage.
     

Applications are reviewed and students accepted as applications are received. Places are reserved for the most qualified students submitting applications by January 15. Places for students with qualified applications received after this date will be considered as space permits.

The School of Architecture admits applicants under one of two categories of admission.

  1. Full Admission with the opportunity to begin freshman architectural design studio in the fall term. Entrance to the fall design studios is competitive and has academic prerequisites. Students with an ACT score of 26 or better (or the SAT equivalent) and a 3.5 GPA or greater may qualify for Early Acceptance if their formal online Supplemental Application Package is received prior to December 15, and depending on available space.
  2. Students not accepted into the Fall Design Studios are placed in the Pre-Architecture program. Pre-Architecture students follow a similar course of study, but do not take ARC 1536 and ARC 1546 (Freshman Studio courses). There are many reasons why a student may not be admitted to the fall design studios: late application, lower ranking in the applicant pool, and lack of pre-requisites are the main reasons. The School of Architecture attracts highly talented students. The study of architecture is highly rigorous: the School wants to ensure that students that enter the program succeed. Pre-Architecture students may re-apply for summer admission into the program after completing all first year requirements; during the summer terms the student will take ARC 1536 and ARC 1546 (Freshman studio courses). Successful completion of these summer studios will allow the student to join the second year (Sophomore) studio in the fall.
  3. Students may receive transfer credit for non-professional courses completed at other universities, colleges, and community colleges, provided a grade of C or better is received for each course. Transfer credit from other architecture programs is reviewed by the admissions committee and the director. Transfer credit for courses listed as technical, vocational, or architectural is solely at the discretion of the department. In addition to transcripts, course descriptions, syllabi, examples of work done and portfolio may all be required to receive any credit for such courses.
     

Finances

Costs for an architectural education are somewhat higher than in other disciplines. In addition to standard costs of fees, tuition, room, board, books, etc, an architectural student must buy required drawing equipment and materials for drawings and models during the school year. This can add $600 or so per semester. Additionally, at least one major field trip is required each year. Charges for field trip expenses are collected with tuition and currently range from $600 in first year to $2500 in fifth year 2-week study abroad program. These charges are intended to cover transportation and lodging during field trips. These fees are not typically refundable after the first day of classes. Students are required to purchase a laptop computer in their first year, selected from a range of models approved by the School.

Scholarships

A number of scholarship opportunities as well as design competitions and awards are available to students within the School of Architecture. See the School's website for additional information. Normal MSU Scholarships are available to in-state and out-of-state students. Inquiries for financial aid or assistance should be sent directly to the MSU Department of Student Financial Aid and/or Office of Admissions and Scholarships.

Counseling

Once accepted into the School of Architecture, students are required to maintain at least an MSU 2.0 cumulative quality point average to remain in design courses. At the end of the first year, a student must have completed all required courses to enter the second year, and at the end of the fourth year, a student must have completed all required courses in order to advance to the fifth year. Any student who receives a grade of D or lower for two sequential design courses must repeat both of these courses and receive a grade of C or higher in both courses to advance in the program, or receive the Bachelor of Architecture degree. If a studio course is failed, a grade of C must be received to advance in the program, or receive the Bachelor of Architecture degree.

Research Centers in the School of Architecture

Carl Small Town Center (CSTC)

Established in 1979, the vision of the Carl Small Town Center is to strengthen communities and to promote a prosperous and sustainable future by raising an awareness of the physical environment through research and excellence in design. For further information, contact the Director of the Carl Small Town Center at 662-325-2207.

Gulf Coast Community Design Studio (GCCDS)

The GCCDS was established after hurricane Katrina. GCCDS is located in Biloxi and is providing community planning and architectural design services to communities and rebuilding organizations. GCCDS has provided design and construction assistance for hundreds of new and existing homes, produced survey and GIS mapping for Biloxi, and planning work for a collaboration of housing organizations. For more information, contact the Director of GCCDS at 228-436-4461.

Curriculum

The curriculum is divided into three levels: the first-year level is defined as the pre-professional program; the second and third year levels comprise the professional core; the fourth year comprises topical and capstone studios, and the fifth-year provides the transition to professional practice and includes a comprehensive capstone project. The first four years are at the main campus of MSU in Starkville; the fifth year is at the Stuart C. Irby Studios at the Jackson Center in downtown Jackson, MS.

The curriculum is composed of four areas of study representing:

(1) Design, (2) History/Theory, (3) Technology, (4) Professional Practice

  1. Design - concerned with the understanding of form, shape, and space responsive to human needs and programs, together with development of architectural communication skills and ecological thinking.
  2. History/Theory - composed of architectural history and philosophy, current architectural ideas, and future implications.
  3. Technology - providing basic knowledge in physical systems of structures, materials, construction, sustainability, and service systems of plumbing, electrical, heating, and air conditioning.
  4. Professional Practice - representing the tools necessary to direct the processes of architecture, integrated project delivery, areas of economics, real estate, finance, land use, law, and office practice.
     

Located at the Jackson Center in downtown Jackson, the fifth-year offers the student the opportunity to develop depth and expertise through research and design projects focused on urban issues. The city provides a major resource for the activities and a laboratory for continued study. Professionals involved in all areas of the built environment contribute to the teaching. This experience provides a transition from the academic foundation to the professional realities of architecture.

General Education Requirements

EN 1103English Composition I3
or EN 1163 Accelerated Composition I
EN 1113English Composition II3
or EN 1173 Accelerated Composition II
Mathematics
MA 1313College Algebra 13
MA 1323Trigonometry 13
MA 1613Calculus for Business and Life Sciences I3
Science
PH 1113General Physics I3
PH 1123General Physics II3
ARC 2713Passive Building Systems3
Humanities
ARC 2313History of Architecture I3
ARC 3313History of Architecture II3
Fine Arts
See General Education courses3
Social Sciences
See General Education courses6
Major Core
ARC 1536Architectural Design I-A 26
ARC 1546Architectural Design I-B6
ARC 2536Architectural Design II-A6
ARC 2546Architectural Design II-B6
ARC 3536Architectural Design III-A6
ARC 3546Architectural Design III-B6
ARC 4536Architectural Design IV-A6
ARC 4546Architectural Design IV-B6
ARC 5576Architectural Design V-A6
ARC 5589Architectural Design V-B9
ART 1213Drawing I3
ART 1223Drawing II 33
ARC 2313History of Architecture I (see Gen. Ed.)3
ARC 3313History of Architecture II (see Gen. Ed.)3
ARC 3323History of Architecture III3
ARC 4313Architectural Theory3
ARC 2713Passive Building Systems (see Gen. Ed.)3
ARC 3723Active Building Systems3
ARC 2723Materials3
ARC 3713Assemblages3
ARC 3904Architectural Structures I4
ARC 3914Structures II4
ARC 4733Site Planning for Architects3
ARC 5383Legal Aspects of Architecture3
ARC 5443Architectural Programming3
ARC 5493Architectural Practice3
ARC 5353Philosophy of Architecture3
ARC 5623Theory of Urban Design3
Approved Electives12
Oral Communication Requirement
Satisfied by successful completion of Architectural Design courses.
Writing Requirement
Satisfied by successful completion of ARC 4313
Total Hours152
1

MA 1313 College Algebra and MA 1323 Trigonometry should be completed prior to beginning studies in architecture. Students may satisfy math prerequisite requirements of MA 1313 College Algebra  with a 24 ACT Math score. Students may also take the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exam to place out of MA 1313. Students with a 26 ACT Math score may satisfy the prerequisite of PH 1113 General Physics I.

2

Pre-Architecture and some transfer students take ARC 1536 and ARC 1546 in the summer terms upon demonstrating completion of required Freshman courses. Applications due February 15.

3

ART 1223 Drawing II is required of all students receiving a grade of “C” or less in ART 1213 Drawing I.

Minor in Architectural Studies

The School of Architecture offers a minor in architectural studies. The minor consists of 18 credit hours of ARC courses. The following courses are available to receive a minor:

Required
ARC 1013Architectural Appreciation3
Taken without instructor approval:
ARC 2313History of Architecture I3
ARC 3313History of Architecture II3
ARC 3323History of Architecture III3
ARC 4313Architectural Theory3
ARC 2713Passive Building Systems3
ARC 4733Site Planning for Architects3
Require consent of instructor for enrollment:
ARC 2723Materials3
ARC 3713Assemblages3
ARC 3723Active Building Systems3
ARC 3573The Art/Architecture of Packaging3
ARC 4990Special Topics in Architecture3

Courses

ARC 1001 First Year Seminar: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. First-year seminars explore a diverse arrary of topics that provide students with an opportunity to learn about a specific discipline from skilled faculty members

ARC 1003 Concept and Form: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites:ART 1213 or ART 1123 or ARC 1536 or BSC 2116) Three hours lecture. Introduction and practice for developing and presenting concepts and criticism

ARC 1013 Architectural Appreciation: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Illustrated study of architecture's role in shaping the quality of man's environment. Architectural history, design theory, and process as it affects daily life. Intended for non-majors. (Same as BCS 1013)

ARC 1536 Architectural Design I-A: 6 hours.

(Prerequisite: Letter of Acceptance into design studio and consent of Director of Architecture). Two hours lecture. Ten hours studio. Introduction to creative process, design principles and methods. Design projects emphasize verbal and visual communication; observing,analyzing, representing, and making of form, space, materials

ARC 1546 Architectural Design I-B: 6 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 1536 or consent of Director). Two hours lecture. Ten hours studio. Introduction to creative process, design principles and methods. Design projects emphasize verbal and visual communication; observing, analyzing, representing, and making of form, space, materials

ARC 2313 History of Architecture I: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A survey of man's effort to mold his environment from prehistory through the Early Middle Ages

ARC 2536 Architectural Design II-A: 6 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 1546 or equivalent or consent of the Director). One hour lecture. Eleven hours studio. Introduction to fundamental aspects of building including structural-spatial ordering systems. Projects emphasize linkages between people and spaces through investigation of perceptual-conceptual issues

ARC 2546 Architectural Design II-B: 6 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 2536 or equivalent or consent of the director). One hour lecture. Eleven hours studio. Introduction to fundamental aspects of building including structural-spatial ordering systems. Projects emphasize linkages between people and spaces through investigation of perceptual-conceptual issues

ARC 2713 Passive Building Systems: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Architecture majors-ARC 1546 and PH 1123; BCS majors-PH 1123; others-instructor consent). Three hours lecture. Investigation of the morphological impacts of various environmental energies on building forms/systems. Includes light, climatic, and ecological factors. Same as BCS 2713

ARC 2723 Materials: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Architecture majors: ARC 2536, Non-architecture majors ARC 1013). Three hours lecture. Analyzing how materials and systems are designed to respond to both environmental energies and needs. Included are soils, concrete, wood, masonry, and metals

ARC 2990 Special Topics in Architecture: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

ARC 3313 History of Architecture II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 2313). Three hours lecture. Survey of major developments in architecture and city planning from the Fourteenth through the Eighteenth Centuries

ARC 3323 History of Architecture III: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 3313). Three hours lecture. Survey of major developments in American architecture and survey of major developments in European architecture during the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

ARC 3536 Architectural Design III-A: 6 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 2546 or equivalent or consent of the Director). One hour lecture. Eleven hours laboratory. The development of building design as a synthesis of environmental concerns, behavioral responses, functional requirements, and technical systems. Studies using small and intermediate scale projects

ARC 3546 Architectural Design III-B: 6 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 3536 or equivalent or consent of the director). One hour lecture. Eleven hours laboratory. The development of building design as a synthesis of environmental concerns, behavioral responses, functional requirements, and technical systems. Studies using small and intermediate scale projects

ARC 3573 The Art/Architecture of Packaging: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture . Investigations into theories, techniques, and procedures of packaging (with emphasis on portfolio design) through traditional, mechanical,, and digital means

ARC 3713 Assemblages: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 2546 and ARC 2723). Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Fabrication and construction are explored in the relationship between nature of materials and methods of assembly

ARC 3723 Active Building Systems: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: ARC 2546 and ARC 2713 or for non-architecture majors–ARC 2713 and BCS 2116 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Concentrates on defining the mechanical and electrical (active) techniques available to architects for integrating thermal comfort and life safety into the built form. (Same as BCS 3723)

ARC 3813 Study Abroad Seminar I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ART 1213 or consent of instructor.) Three hours seminar. Six weeks of on-site instruction in Italy as part of the CAAD Italy study abroad program. Course content will vary to reflect the expertise of the instructor (Same as ART 3813 and ID 3813.)

ARC 3823 Study Abroad Seminar II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ART 1213 or consent of instructor.) Three hours seminar. Six weeks of on-site instruction in Italy as part of the CAAD Italy study abroad program. Course content will vary to reflect the expertise of the instructor (Same as ART 3823 and ID 3823.)

ARC 3904 Architectural Structures I: 4 hours.

(Prerequisite:MA 1613 and either ARC 1546 or BCS 2226) Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. Application of the principles of statics and the strength of materials on structural elements. (Same as BCS 3904)

ARC 3914 Structures II: 4 hours.

(Prerequisite:ARC 3904) Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. Design and analysis of structural elements as part of frames and other structural systems. (Same as BCS 3914)

ARC 4000 Directed Individual Study in Architecture: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged with approval of School of Architecture Director

ARC 4152 Digital Design I Laboratory: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: Undergraduate-permission of instructor; Graduate-none). Four hours laboratory. Laboratory exploration of digital input and output devices concentrating of conceptual design, design development, and manufacturing/construction CADCAM processes using automated machines and devices

ARC 4313 Architectural Theory: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 3323 or equivalent and consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A critical investigation of writings that have shaped architectural theory

ARC 4333 Contemporary Philosophy and Architecture: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor). Three hours lecture. An examination of modernism and postmodernism in philosophy and architecture. (Same as PHI 4013/6013)

ARC 4536 Architectural Design IV-A: 6 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 3546 or equivalent or consent of director). One hour lecture. Eleven hours laboratory. Design of architectural elements integrating building systems, social concerns, and environmental factors. Studies involve intermediate to large scale projects in realistic architectural situations

ARC 4546 Architectural Design IV-B: 6 hours.

(Prerequisites: ARC 4536 or equivalent of consent of director). One hour lecture. Eleven hours laboratory. Design of architectural elements integrating building systems, social concerns, and environmental factors. Studies involve intermediate to large scale projects in realistic architectural situations

ARC 4613 CREATE Common Ground: 3 hours.

Three hours seminar. Service learning through urban design, issues of economic development/renewal, historic preservation, and transportation for small towns in the CREATE Foundation region

ARC 4633 Architecture and Virtual Spaces: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture.Exploration of physical and virtual worlds from a theoretical, technical, communication, and design perspective

ARC 4733 Site Planning for Architects: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 2546). Three hours lecture. Introduces the natural ecological systems as they relate to human's impact on them, along with the natural system's resistance to human's impact

ARC 4990 Special Topics in Architecture: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

ARC 5353 Philosophy of Architecture: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture and field visits. The philosophical issues of meaning, appreciation, and the distinctive characteristics of the artistic creation

ARC 5383 Legal Aspects of Architecture: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Investigation and research regarding architectural issues including architectural law, contracts, litigation, case studies and other topical issues

ARC 5443 Architectural Programming: 3 hours.

One hour lecture. Six hours laboratory. Advanced study of analytical and intuitive methods of programming, leading to development of terminal project program to be used in ARC 5589

ARC 5493 Architectural Practice: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Investigation into issues facing the graduate architect including: responsibilities to the community and the profession; project and business management; client relations; and delivery of services

ARC 5576 Architectural Design V-A: 6 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 4546). One hour lecture. Fifteen hours laboratory. Theory and application of architectural problems at urban scale. Investigation of social, economic, political issues effecting architectural programming and design

ARC 5589 Architectural Design V-B: 9 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 5576). Two hours lecture . Twenty hours laboratory. Development of architectural project of complex and comprehensive nature. Emphasis upon thorough examination of all aspects of building

ARC 5623 Theory of Urban Design: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. General introduction into field of urban design. Course divided into two areas of theory and practice as they relate to contemporary urban development

ARC 5990 Advanced Special Topics in Architecture: 9 hours.

ARC 6114 Professional Practice Strategies: 4 hours.

Four hours lecture. Exploration of the students career goals relative to emerging technology impact and design/architectural practice trends

ARC 6152 Digital Design I Laboratory: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: Undergraduate-permission of instructor; Graduate-none). Four hours laboratory. Laboratory exploration of digital input and output devices concentrating of conceptual design, design development, and manufacturing/construction CADCAM processes using automated machines and devices

ARC 6162 Digital Design II Laboratory: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite:ARC 4152/6152). Four hours laboratory. Advanced laboratory exploration of digital imput and output devices concentrating on conceptual design, design development and manufacturing/construction CADCAM processes using automated machines and devices

ARC 6333 Contemporary Philosophy and Architecture: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor). Three hours lecture. An examination of modernism and postmodernism in philosophy and architecture. (Same as PHI 4013/6013)

ARC 6613 CREATE Common Ground: 3 hours.

Three hours seminar. Service learning through urban design, issues of economic development/renewal, historic preservation, and transportation for small towns in the CREATE Foundation region

ARC 6633 Architecture and Virtual Spaces: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture.Exploration of physical and virtual worlds from a theoretical, technical, communication, and design perspective

ARC 6813 Public Design Seminar I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Acceptance in Public Design Inter Program.) Three hours lecture. Public practice theory; limitations of standard practice to meet contemporary social, economic and environmental needs; values and leadership of community organizations; examples of alternative practice

ARC 6823 Public Design Seminar II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 6813.) Three hours lecture. Understanding community; local services and economic problems and global environmental risks; understanding minority subcultures, poverty, and the role of non-profit organizations

ARC 6833 Public Design Seminar III: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 6823.) Three hours lecture. Creating and using tools of public practice to help communities address social, economic and environmental problems; leadership skills, advocacy planning, sustaining a non-profit practice

ARC 6853 Public Practice and Projects I: 3 hours.

(Prequisite: Acceptance in Public Design Intern Program). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Various models of design practice presented by ten outside practitioners. Parallel studio team project

ARC 6863 Public Practice and Projects II: 3 hours.

(Prequisite: ARC 6853). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Survey of governmental and non-profit organizations that work in the community presented by ten outside practitioners. Parallel studio team project

ARC 6873 Public Practice and Projects III: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: ARC 6863.) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Challenging the status-quo; presentations by ten visionary people. Parallel studio team projects

ARC 6990 Special Topics in Architecture: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

ARC 7000 Directed Individual Study in Architecture: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

ARC 8000 Thesis Research/ Thesis in Architecture: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

ARC 8114 Digital Design I: 4 hours.

Four hours lecture. Exploration of digital input and output devices concentrating on conceptual design/visualization processes using 3D/4D software and augmenting hardware devices

ARC 8124 Digital Design II: 4 hours.

(Prerequisite:ARC 8114) Four hours lecture. Exploration of digital input and output devices concentration on conceptual design, design development, and manufacturing/construction CADCAM processes using automated machines and devices

ARC 8134 Digital Design III: 4 hours.

Four hour lecture. Advanced exploration of digital input and output methods using 1,2,3,4, and 5D modeling software/hardware application in both virtual and physical problems in theoretical and applied design and research projects

ARC 8172 Digital Design III Laboratory: 2 hours.

Four hours laboratory. Advanced laboratory providing exploration of digital input and output methods using 1,2,3,4 and 5D modeling software/hardward applications in both virtural and physical problems in theoretical and applied design and research projects

ARC 8224 Research and Writing in Architecture: 4 hours.

Four hours lecture. Provides the student with general grounding in the process of research, problem identification writing, and development of a formal argument in design and architecture

ARC 8444 Interactive Media: 4 hours.

(Prerequisite:ARC 6633 ) Three hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Exploration of media and interaction design solutions through case studies and design exercises using emerging technologies and congruent design concepts

ARC 8990 Special Topics in Architecture: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)