2017-18 Academic Catalog

History

Department Head: Dr. Alan I. Marcus
Graduate Coordinator: Dr. Stephen Brain

214 Allen Hall
Box H
Mississippi State, MS  39762
Telephone: 662-325-3604
E-mail: correspondence@history.msstate.edu

Diversity Certificate Program Director: Dr. Alan I. Marcus
214 Allen Hall
Box H
Mississippi State, MS  39762
Telephone: 662-325-7075
E-mail: aimarcus@history.msstate.edu

The Department of History offers programs leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.  Fields for the master’s degree are:  United States, Europe, Latin America, Asia, Africa, and World.  Fields for the PhD. Degree are:  United States and Europe.  A student may choose a minor field of study outside the History Department with concurrence of his or her advisor.  Not all of the fields listed above are available for dissertation research or as the major field for a Master of Arts degree.

Admission Criteria

The History Department expects an applicant to have either an overall GPA of 3.00 or a GPA of 3.00 in the last two years of undergraduate study.  The prerequisite for admission to a graduate program in history is a minimum of 18 hours of undergraduate history courses; for a graduate minor in history, 12 hours of undergraduate history courses are required.  A Ph.D. applicant must submit the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and must submit a writing sample with their application packet to the Office of the Graduate School.  Applicants who received the M.A. in History from MSU are not required to take the GRE.  Examples of acceptable writing samples are publications, chapters from a thesis, or a seminar paper.

An international student intending to pursue a graduate degree in history must meet all regular requirements and, in addition, present a Test of English as a Foreign Language score of 550 or higher.  This requirement does not apply to international students with degrees from an American institution nor to students from countries where English is the primary language. The applicant should understand that the History Department uses the statement of purpose as a major factor in making admissions decisions.  It is to the applicant’s advantage to take special care in completing this statement.  The applicant should add additional pages to the statement of purpose if necessary.  To facilitate the selection of an advisor the applicant should explain his/her fields of interest in the statement of purpose.  An applicant whose quantitative credentials meet the stated criteria may still be denied admission because of qualitative factors. Normally, applicants will receive an admission decision within 30 days after the receipt of all required materials by the department.

Application Deadlines

Fall Semester April 1
Spring Semester November 1
Teaching Assistantships (fall semester only) March 1

Provisional Admission

An applicant who has not fully met the GPA requirement stipulated by the University may be admitted on a provisional basis. The provisionally-admitted student is eligible for a change to regular status after receiving a 3.00 GPA on the first 9 hours of graduate courses at Mississippi State University (with no grade lower than a C).  The first 9 hours of graduate courses must be within the student's program of study.  Courses with an S grade, transfer credits, or credits earned while in Unclassified status cannot be used to satisfy this requirement.  If a 3.00 is not attained, the provisional student shall be dismissed from the graduate program.  Academic departments may set higher standards for students to fulfill provisional requirements; a student admitted with provisional status should contact the graduate coordinator for the program’s specific requirements.  While in the provisional status, a student is not eligible to hold a graduate assistantship.

Contingent Admission

An applicant lacking an adequate background in history may be granted contingent admission and be required to take additional courses at the undergraduate level.

Academic Performance

Although one C grade may be included in a graduate program, the History Department views C grades as evidence of unsatisfactory work.  A student who earns a second C grade will be dismissed from the program.  Students earning one grade of D or F will also be dismissed from the program.  A candidate for degree must have achieved a B average by the end of the coursework.

Diversity Certificate Program

The Diversity Certificate Program seeks to teach workplace success by providing the multi-cultural knowledge and skills necessary to navigate among a diverse workforce.  At the heart of this post-baccalaureate program is the demand that students learn and think critically about race, race relations, ethnicity, social class and inequality, religion, and gender. This requirement will produce employees who have the necessary sensitivity and understanding to accept important leadership challenges and to advance themselves and their workplace.

Its methods are straightforward. Each student seeking a certificate must take at least one of two courses from each of four distinct fields: History, Sociology, Gender Studies and African American Studies.  Students are free to take more than the minimum number of courses; however, the program an intense immersion in one course from each area will enhance understanding sufficient for business persons to achieve objectives most sensibly and expeditiously.

The choice of these four fields is deliberate and precise. History will enable students to learn the various forces, activities and trends leading to the present day world; history grants perspective. Sociology will explore and explain the interactions among and between diverse peoples in the present day; it explores social dynamics. Both African American and Gender Studies offer a more multivariate approach. Borrowing from a number of disciplines and specialties, they offer an interdisciplinary, multicultural perspective, revealing numerous, tangible intersections among institutional sexism and racism, power relationships, economic allocation and self and group actualization.

Together, these four fields create a tightly woven package that will make a true difference both in the students who take the courses and the workplaces in which they operate. Each of the courses has a similar approach using classic writings, great thinkers and pertinent events as well as analysis and understanding of those whose voices in social settings remain obscured. Each utilizes the most recent information and insight to fashion an acute demonstration of how multicultural knowledge and understanding is essential to successful functioning in all aspects of the modern world.

Admission

Applicants must be graduates of accredited undergraduate institutions and be admitted by the Graduate Office either as a degree-program or unclassified graduate student.  Students wishing to apply for the certificate program must submit a writing sample explaining how they plan to use the Diversity Certificate in their careers.  This document is required from degree-program and unclassified graduate students and must be submitted directly to Dr. Alan Marcus.  International students must obtain a TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 625 PBT (106 iBT) or an IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) score of 8.0 or better.

Accelerated Program 

Undergraduate students may apply to the Accelerated Program once they have accumulated 60 hours of graded coursework and 15 hours of graded coursework in history.  Applicants must have maintained a 3.5 GPA in both their cumulative undergraduate coursework and their coursework in history.  Admission is contingent upon the student completing HI 3903 with a grade of B or better.  The initial application will be to the History Department.  Applicants must submit a completed graduate application form, a statement of purpose for graduate study, transcripts, and at least two letters of recommendation from history faculty members.  The application deadlines for this program are November 1 and April 1.  All applications will be reviewed at the start of the semester for which the student has been admitted into the program; students whose GPA has fallen below the minimum requirement or who have failed to complete HI 3903 with a B, will be removed from the program.  If a student intends to apply for this program he or she should meet with the graduate coordinator during the advising period prior to the semester for which the student intends to apply for admission to select the appropriate courses.  The student must apply to the Graduate School for regular admission into the graduate program during his or her last year of enrollment as an undergraduate.

Master of Arts Degree Program of Study

The History Department offers the Master of Arts degree with an emphasis in United States, European, Latin American, African, Asian, or World History.  A student may choose between a thesis and a non-thesis degree program.  Each student will choose a primary and a secondary area of emphasis.  The primary area of emphasis will be drawn from one of the following subject areas: United States, European, Latin American, Asian, African, or World History.  The secondary area of emphasis for a thesis student will be drawn from either another one of the above subject areas, or a topical field related to a particular region or historical phenomenon.  Students can minor in a field outside of history; a minor outside of history must include at least nine semester hours. 

A degree candidate with a thesis must also demonstrate proficiency in one research skill which may be either reading proficiency in a foreign language or proficiency in quantitative methods or some other relevant research skill as determined by the student’s graduate committee.  The non-thesis program is designed for students planning to enter secondary education or who want to develop a broad understanding of history for a variety of other reasons.  The secondary area of emphasis for a non-thesis degree candidate must be drawn from a geographic region other than the one the student has selected for the primary field.   The non-thesis program does not require a research skill.

Each student must have a graduate committee composed of three graduate faculty members who will oversee the student’s progress toward the M.A. degree and conduct a written comprehensive examination and an oral defense of it at the conclusion of the student’s graduate studies.  At least two of the committee members must be members of the History Department’s graduate faculty.  If a minor from outside the department is selected, one member must be from the minor area of study.

Each master’s degree candidate will complete a comprehensive examination at the completion of graduate studies.  The examination will cover both primary and secondary fields and will be taken at a time and in a format determined by the student’s graduate committee.  The student choosing the thesis option will also be expected to provide an oral defense of the thesis at the conclusion of her/his graduate studies.

Master of Arts in History (United States Emphasis) - Thesis

Research seminar3
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
Select two of the following:6
Colloquium in Colonial and Revolutionary America
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1787-1877
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1877-1945
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1945-present
Additional graduate-level coursework18
Total Hours30

Master of Arts in History (United States Emphasis) - Non-Thesis

Research seminar3
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
Select two of the following - one pre-1877 and one post-1877:6
Colloquium in Colonial and Revolutionary America
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1787-1877
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1877-1945
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1945-present
Additional graduate-level coursework18
Total Hours30

Master of Arts in History (European, Latin American, Asian, African, or World History Emphasis) - Thesis

Research seminar3
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
Additional graduate-level coursework24
Total Hours30

Master of Arts in History (European, Latin American, Asian, African, or World History Emphasis) - Non-Thesis

Research seminar3
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
Additional graduate-level coursework24
Total Hours30

5th Year Master of Arts Degree

The History Department offers undergraduate students with an interest in history the opportunity to complete a Master of Arts in History with an additional year of post-baccalaureate study.  This program offers both the thesis and non-thesis options outlined in the regular Master of Arts degree program.

Requirements

Students in this program must meet the same expectations regarding primary and secondary fields of emphasis, research skills, and forming a graduate committee as students in the regular M.A. program.  Each candidate for the 5th year M.A. degree must complete the required coursework for either the thesis or non-thesis M.A.

Baccalaureate Degree and 5th Year Master of Arts in History (United States Emphasis) - Thesis

Baccalaureate degree
Research seminar3
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
Select two of the following:6
Colloquium in Colonial and Revolutionary America
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1787-1877
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1877-1945
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1945-present
Additional graduate-level coursework18
Total Hours30

Baccalaureate Degree and 5th Year Master of Arts in History (United States Emphasis) - Non-Thesis

Baccalaureate degree
Research seminar3
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
Select two of the following - one pre-1877 and one post-1877:6
Colloquium in Colonial and Revolutionary America
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1787-1877
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1877-1945
Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1945-present
Additional graduate-level coursework18
Total Hours30

Baccalaureate Degree and 5th Year Master of Arts in History (European, Latin American, Asian, African, or World History Emphasis) - Thesis

Baccalaureate degree
Research seminar3
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
Additional graduate-level coursework24
Total Hours30

Baccalaureate Degree and 5th Year Master of Arts in History (European, Latin American, Asian, African, or World History Emphasis) - Non-Thesis

Baccalaureate degree
Research seminar3
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
Additional graduate-level coursework24
Total Hours30

Program of Study as an Undergraduate

In the course of completing the requirements for the student’s undergraduate degree the student may enroll in up to 9 hours of graduate courses which will count toward both the student’s undergraduate degree and the M.A. in history.  These courses can be at either the 6000 or 8000 level, and the student should enroll in them for graduate credit.  Once the graduate course has been completed, the student and advisor will apply to the Registrar to have the course count for undergraduate credit.  Once this application is granted, the course will appear on the student’s undergraduate transcript.  A split-level course will appear as the 4000-level equivalent of the 6000-level course.  An 8000-level course will appear on the student’s transcript as a 4993 Special Topics course with the same name as the 8000-level course.  The student may opt out of the 5th year M.A. program at any time and complete a regular undergraduate major in history.  Once the student has opted out, however, no further courses will be allowed to count for both graduate and undergraduate credit.

Registration for a graduate course requires the undergraduate student to complete the Undergraduate Request to Enroll in Graduate Courses(s) form. The student can access the form at http://www.grad.msstate.edu/forms/pdf/accel.pdf and must submit the completed form to the Office of the Graduate School.  The OGS will inform the student by email when he/she can register for the graduate course.

The student will receive the bachelor’s degree after the requirements for that degree have been met.  On completion of the degree the student will be admitted into the regular graduate program provided the student has received no grade lower than a C in any course taken for graduate credit and not received more than one C in the courses taken for undergraduate credit; in either of these cases the student will be dismissed from the graduate program. If the student’s GPA in graduate-level courses is below a 3.00 the student will enter the graduate portion of the 5th Year M.A. program on academic probation and may be removed from the program if the overall GPA does not rise above 3.00 at the end of the student’s first full semester in the graduate program.

Program of Study for the Student’s Post-Baccalaureate Year

In the student’s post-baccalaureate year he or she will be expected to complete either the thesis or non-thesis degree program.  Students who do not complete the 5th Year M.A. program by the end of the summer following their first post-baccalaureate year will be automatically transferred into the regular M.A. program.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The History Department offers the Ph.D. degree with a primary emphasis in either United States or European History.  The student will choose a primary field of emphasis in either United States History or European History.  Students are required to prepare for examination in four fields of emphasis.  Two fields of emphasis will be chronological fields within the primary area of emphasis (U.S. or European).  A third field of emphasis will be drawn from the department’s core areas (International Security and Internal Safety, History of Science and Technology, and Agricultural, Rural, and Environment History).  The final field of emphasis will be a topical or regional field or in a discipline other than history.  Fields of emphasis outside of the History Department must include at least 12 hours.  The student should refer to the History Department’s list of available fields of emphasis for more information. Each student must hold a bachelor’s degree from an appropriately accredited institution of higher learning and possess qualifications indicating ability to do graduate work on a doctoral level, as determined by the department’s Graduate Committee.

The department expects that the student will normally complete at least 60 hours of coursework (40 classroom hours and 20 research hours) beyond the bachelor’s degree for the Ph.D. degree in history.  Credit earned in a master’s degree program at Mississippi State or up to 20 credit hours earned elsewhere may be used to satisfy requirements for the doctoral program if it is appropriate to the candidate’s doctoral fields and acceptable to the student’s graduate committee. Each student pursuing the Ph.D. degree in history must demonstrate proficiency in at least one research skill by the end of the fourth semester of his or her enrollment in the program.  This requirement may be fulfilled by demonstrating a reading knowledge of a foreign language or by demonstrating proficiency in another research skill appropriate to the student’s field of study.  Each candidate is required to complete, or have completed, HI 8923 at Mississippi State and two research seminars.  Each student is also required to select a specialization in one of the Department’s three core areas: 

  • International Security and Internal Safety, or
  • History of Science and Technology, or
  • Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History.

Doctor of Philosophy in History (United States Emphasis)

Two research seminars6
HI 9000Dissertation Research /Dissertation in History20
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
HI 8933Colloquium in Colonial and Revolutionary America 13
HI 8943Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1787-1877 13
HI 8953Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1877-1945 13
HI 8963Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1945-present 13
Select one of the following in specialization area:3
Seminar in History of Science and Technology
Seminar in History of International Security and Internal Safety
U.S. Agricultural History, 1500-2000
Three seminar-related courses in the specialiszation 29
HIST XXXXAdditional graduate coursework7
Total Hours60
1

Or an equivalent acceptable to the graduate committee. 

2

Chosen in consultation with the student’s graduate committee. 

Doctor of Philosophy in History (European History Emphasis)

Two research seminars6
Research20
HI 8923Historiography and Historical Method3
Select one of the following in specialization area:3
Seminar in History of Science and Technology
Seminar in History of International Security and Internal Safety
U.S. Agricultural History, 1500-2000
Three seminar-related courses in the specialization 19
HIST XXXXAdditional graduate coursework19
Total Hours60
1

Chosen in consultation with the student’s graduate committee. 

The prospective Ph.D. candidate must understand that work toward a Ph.D. degree is different from other academic work he or she may have undertaken.  The holder of a Ph.D. degree is assumed to have mastered his or her field of study and to have developed an ability to do original research and to make original contributions to knowledge.  It is the responsibility of the student’s major professor and committee members to determine when this level of understanding has been reached.  It cannot be measured by the number of courses completed, and the exact amount of coursework required of each student in the History Department may vary.

Each student must have a graduate committee composed of at least four graduate faculty members.  The chairman must be from the student’s major field of emphasis and must be a full member of the graduate faculty.  He or she will normally be the student’s future dissertation director.  The committee will include a second reader, who will assist the dissertation director, and at least two other members.  Four members of the committee must be members of the History Department’s graduate faculty.

When the student and his or her major professor agree that adequate preparation has been made, the major professor will schedule a comprehensive examination.  Full-time Ph.D. students should normally take their comprehensive examinations within three years of enrollment, and part-time Ph.D. students should take their comprehensive examinations within four years of enrollment.  The student must have either completed all coursework or be within 6 hours of completing the coursework.  The student must have fulfilled the research skill requirement and must have met all other History Department and Graduate School requirements.  Each student will take four written comprehensive examinations.  Students will be allowed one day for each field, and the four examinations must be completed within a two-week period.  Faculty members who have collaborated in preparing a student for a particular field of emphasis may contribute to one examination.  The student’s committee will then decide if the quality of the written examinations warrants proceeding to the oral examination.  If a student fails either the written or oral part of the comprehensive examination, she or he may retake it after the passage of four months.  A second failure will result in termination from the program.

After passing comprehensive examinations, the student must submit a dissertation proposal which must be approved in writing by all members of the student’s graduate committee before the student will be admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D.  The dissertation proposal must include at least the topic, historical question to be answered, hypothesis answering that question, and sources to be consulted.  The dissertation proposal must specify both the director and the second reader.  No candidates will be granted a dissertation fellowship until the approved dissertation proposal is on file in the History Department office.

The composition of the candidate’s graduate committee for the dissertation need not be identical to the committee which conducts the comprehensive examination.  The second reader of a dissertation will be actively involved in the dissertation process.  The second reader will be kept informed of the progress the candidate is making in the research and will comment upon drafts of outlines and chapters as the candidate writes them.

The dissertation must show the candidate’s mastery of research methods in history and must make an original contribution to scholarship in the candidate’s field.  The dissertation must reflect at least 20 semester hours of dissertation research. The candidate’s graduate committee must approve the dissertation and administer a final oral examination (defense).  The dissertation must be provided to the members of the committee at least fourteen days before the defense.

For additional information contact the Graduate Coordinator.

Diversity Certificate Program

HI 8773Issues in Women's History3
or HI 8783 Issues in African American History
SO 8983Seminar in Race Relations3
or SO 8990 Special Topics in Sociology
AAS 8793Rae and Cultural Diversity in the Workplace3
or AAS 8603 Racism and the Color Line
GS 8963Exploring Issues in Gender3
or GS 8973 Gender and Work
Total Hours12

The Diversity Certificate Program requires a B or better in 12 credit hours earned by taking one course from each of the pairs.

HI 6133 Civil War and Reconstruction 1850 to 1877: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. Origins of the secessionist movement and the Civil War, the political and military battles of the War, and the struggle to reunify the nation

HI 6143 Revolutionary America: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. American provinces from 1740 until 1783. Emphasis on maturation. pluralism, role in British empire, religion, Enlightenment, and causes, idealogy, and conduct of the Revolution

HI 6153 U.S. History 1877 to 1917: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A survey of political, economic, social, and constitutional developments

HI 6163 U.S. 1917 - 1945: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A study of all major aspects of American government and life through World War II

HI 6173 U.S. History Since 1945: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A study of all major aspects of American government and life since the end of World War II

HI 6183 U.S. Economic History: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. An intensive study of economic change in the United States and its impact on political and social development. (Same as EC 4183/6183)

HI 6193 U.S. Environmental History: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:Any 1000 level history course) Three hours lecture. A survey of the impact of the environment in shaping the American culture,literature,politics, and economy from European colonization to the present

HI 6203 Diplomatic History of the U.S.: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A study of American foreign policy from the founding of the Republic to the present time

HI 6213 History of Grand Strategy & International Security: 3 hours.

(Prerequisiste: Completion of any 1000 level history course) Three hours seminar. A discussion of the historic literature of grand strategy and key events in the history of international relations

HI 6223 Intelligence Gathering in the 20th Century: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:Completion of any 1000-level history course or consent of instructor). Three hour lecture. A discussion of myth/reality of intelligence gathering and its use as a military or diplomatic tool

HI 6233 American Military History: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A survey of the military history of the United States from colonial times to the present

HI 6243 American Life and Thought: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A survey of the changing lives and ideas of Americans from colonial to modern times. Family life, religion, recreation, dress, communities, social theories, medicine

HI 6253 History of Religion in America: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000 level history course). Three hours lecture. Surveys history of religion in America, emphasizing interaction with social and political developments

HI 6263 America's Vietnam War: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. Analysis of the U.S. conduct of Vietnam War, such as: Cold War context, presidential decision-making, military doctrine, domestic opposition, and legacy

HI 6273 Women in American History: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A study of the economic, political, and social activities of women in American history. Emphasis on Southern women

HI 6293 History of Gender and Science: 3 hours.

Three hours seminar. Historical survey of scientific research on sex, the role of gender in the culture of science, and the contributions of women to scientific practice

HI 6303 The Old South: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. Development of the Old South from colonization through the slavery controversy and the Civil War

HI 6313 The New South: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. Southern life from Reconstruction times to the present

HI 6323 The American West: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A survey of the western frontier in American history from colonial times to 1900

HI 6363 African-American History and Culture: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course) Africian-Americans from their Africian origins to the present, emphasizing black-white relations in the making of America.(Same as AAS 4363 )

HI 6373 History of Modern Civil Rights Movement: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A history of the Black struggle for equality in the United States between 1930 and 1970. (Same as AAS 4373 )

HI 6383 Native American History Since 1830: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: completion of any 1000-level history course) Three hours lecture. Study of American Indian history to the present with emphasis on the loss of Indian autonomy and the struggles to regain it

HI 6393 Rural America: 3 hours.

Examines the transformation and cultural significance of rural America from the colonial era to the early 21st century

HI 6403 The Ancient Near East: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A study of the origins and development of civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Syria-Palestine from prehistoric times to the end of the Persian period. (Same as MEC 4403/6403 and REL 4403/6403)

HI 6413 Ancient Greece and Rome: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A survey of the civilization of ancient Greece and Rome

HI 6493 Terrorism in America: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Survey of the impact of domestic and international terrorism on American politics, society, and foreign policy since the Civil War

HI 6553 Science and Technology to Newton: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. An examination of the history of science and technology from pre-history to Newton

HI 6583 China Since 1800: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. China's tumultuous centuries of imperial decline, foreign assault, and nationalist and communist revolutions. Cultural and social transformations and the quest for institutional and economic modernization

HI 6593 Japan Since 1600: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Examines the major political, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic events that have brought Japan from sheltered feudalism to international preeminence

HI 6603 Medieval Civilization: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. An intensive study of medieval institutions and culture

HI 6613 History of the Soviet Union: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. The political, social, cultural and economic developement of the Soviet Union from its pre-Revolutionary origins to its collapse in 1991

HI 6643 Renaissance and Reformation: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. The Renaissance and its relation to religion, politics, and social life; origins of the Reformation movement and its effect on Europe in early modern times

HI 6653 History of Science and Technology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. Science and technology from Newton to the present, emphasizing the relationship between scientific innovation and technological application

HI 6683 Europe: The First World War to Hitler: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. European development from the beginning of the First World War to the beginning of the Second World War

HI 6693 Europe: The Second World War to the Common Market: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. European development from the beginning of the Second World War to the present time

HI 6713 Tudor and Stuart England: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. The development of English institutions during the Tudor and Stuart periods

HI 6723 History of Britain Since 1688: 3 hours.

Three hours seminar. Historical survey of Britian since 1688 with particular emphasis on political, economic and cultural change and relations between the component nationalities with the United Kingdom

HI 6743 Evolution of International Politics: 3 hours.

Three hours seminar. Historical survey of international politics since the eighteenth century within its economic, cultural, and military context

HI 6763 History of Modern Germany: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. The history of German institutions in modern times

HI 6773 History of Modern France: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. The history of French institutions in modern times

HI 6783 African Civilization to 1880: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. This is a survey course which traces the major developments in Africa to 1880. (Same as AAS 4783)

HI 6793 Modern Africa: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. This course traces Africa's history from 1880 to the present. It discusses how Africa lost and regained its sovereignty and the dilemma of independence. (Same as AAS 4793 )

HI 6853 Modern Mexico: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. The political, economic, and social development of the Mexican nation from Independence through the age of dictators to the Great Revolution and its aftermath

HI 6883 U.S. History of Medicine: 3 hours.

Three hour lecture. Survey of the development of the medical profession and public health in the United States. Medical education and practice, scientific research, epidemics and illness emphasized

HI 6903 The Far East: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000-level history course). Three hours lecture. A study of the impact of western civilization on China, Japan, and India in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

HI 6990 Special Topics in History: 1-9 hours.

(Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

HI 7000 Directed Individual Study in History: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

HI 8000 Thesis Research/ Thesis in History: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

HI 8233 Readings in American Military History: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing)

HI 8523 Readings in European History, 1789-1914: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing)

HI 8543 Diversity and Discrimination Law: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Analysis of federal and state laws and regulations on diversity in the workplace, emphasizing race and national origin, sex, physical disability, religion, and age. (This course is available to students enrolled in the Graduate Online Diversity Certificate Program. It is not open to students seeking to complete degree requirements.) (Same as AAS 8543)

HI 8603 Racism and the Color Line: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:Graduate Standing and enrollment in the Diversity Certificate Program ). Three hours lecture. An analysis of race relations and racial inequality in the United States. Designed for online Diversity Certificate program students. ( Same as AAS 8603)

HI 8773 Issues in Women's History: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:Graduate standing and enrollment in the Diversity Certificate program). Three hours lecture. An analysis of major issues in American women's history. Designed for online Diveristy Certificate Program students

HI 8783 Issues in African American History: 3 hours.

(Prerequisiste:Graduate standing and enrollment in the Diversity Certificate Program) Three hours lecture. An analysis of major issues in African American history. Designed for online Diversity Certificate Program students

HI 8793 Race and the Cultural Diversity in the Workplace: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:Graduate standing and enrollment in the Diversity Certificate Program). Three hours lecture. An analysis of concepts, issues, and laws relating to race and cultural diversity in public and private organizations. Designed for online Diversity Certificate Program students. (Same as AAS 8793 )

HI 8803 Graduate Colloquium: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing). Three hours lecture. Topical focus to be determined by the faculty member con- ducting the colloquium. (May be taken for credit more than once)

HI 8813 Seminar in U.S. History Before 1877: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing)

HI 8823 Seminar in U.S. History Since 1877: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing)

HI 8833 Seminar in Southern History: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing)

HI 8853 Seminar in European History Before 1789: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing)

HI 8863 Seminar in European History Since 1789: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing)

HI 8873 Seminar in History of Science and Technology: 3 hours.

Three hours seminar. An intensive study of historical topics relating to the relationships among science, technology, culture, and society from 1700 to the present

HI 8883 U.S. Agricultural History, 1500-2000: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing). Three hours seminar. An intensive study of agricultural and rural development in the United States and its impact on social, economic, and political changes

HI 8893 Seminar in History of International Security and Internal Safety: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:Graduate standing) Three hours seminar. An intensive study of historical topics in international security and internal safety from 1700 to present

HI 8923 Historiography and Historical Method: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing). Three hours lecture. The writings and interpretations of leading European and American historians; bibliographical aids in history; methods of research; preparation of bibliographies; practice in writing a research paper

HI 8933 Colloquium in Colonial and Revolutionary America: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A review of the major themes in the history and historiography of North America for the colonial period through the independence of the United States

HI 8943 Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1787-1877: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Review of the major themes in the history and historigraphy of the United States from the ratification of the Constitution to the end of Reconstruction

HI 8953 Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1877-1945: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A review of the major themes in the history and historiography of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the end of the Second World War

HI 8963 Colloquium in the U.S. History from 1945-present: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture.A review of the major themes in the history or historiography of the United States from the end of World War II until the present

HI 8973 Colloquium U.S. Environmental and Agricultural History: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A review of the major themes in the agricultural history & historiograpahy of the United States

HI 8983 Introduction to Public History: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Graduate Standing). Three hours seminar. Introduction to the literature, methods, and applications of public history, which is the practice of making history accessible to the public in various settings outside academia (museums, historical societies, the web, etc.)

HI 8990 Special Topics in History: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

HI 9000 Dissertation Research /Dissertation in History: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged