2017-18 Academic Catalog

Industrial and Systems Engineering

Department Head: Dr. John M. Usher, PE
Graduate Coordinator: Dr. Stanley F. Bullington, PE

260 McCain Building
Box 9542
Mississippi State, MS 39762
Telephone: 662-325-3865
E-mail: grad@ise.msstate.edu

The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering offers the Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial and Systems Engineering. In addition, the Department offers the Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with both thesis and non-thesis options. The M.S. (thesis option) is a research-oriented degree and serves to prepare students for positions in industry or government or for further graduate study in industrial and systems engineering or related areas. The M.S. (non-thesis option) is designed to prepare students for positions in business and industry that require a graduate education.

Concentrations offered at the master’s level are:

Human Factors and Ergonomics Concentration (HFE)

This concentration is designed for students who wish to increase their understanding of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE).  Students will be exposed to both a breadth and depth of HFE principles and practices including but not limited to physical ergonomics, cognitive ergonomics, and occupational safety and health.

Industrial Systems Concentration (SYS)

This concentration prepares students for general Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE) work.  It is designed to allow the student a high degree of flexibility in selecting a program that meets his/her needs.  For example, the student might choose to specialize in one or more areas of ISE (e.g., quality engineering) or choose a very broad program covering several ISE fields.

Management Systems Engineering Concentration (MGTS)

This concentration is designed for students who wish to increase their understanding and capability in the areas of management systems engineering and general engineering management.  The philosophy behind this option is that students can be provided with knowledge that will enable them to apply an engineering approach to problems involved in the design and operation of management systems.

Manufacturing Systems Concentration (MFGS)

This concentration is designed for students who wish to increase their understanding of the design, analysis and control of manufacturing systems and processes.

Operations Research Concentration (OPRS)

This concentration is designed for students who wish to increase their understanding of and use of Operations Research (OR) skills for systems analysis and design.

Accelerated Programs

Highly qualified undergraduates in the Bagley College of Engineering are encouraged to consider applying to one of two Accelerated Programs offered by the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering.  

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering leading to Master of Science in Industrial Engineering

The first program leads toward a Master of Science degree in Industrial Engineering.  This program permits the students to earn up to 9 hours of graduate level coursework after the completion of 75 hours of graded coursework toward their B.S. degree.  Students take graduate-level courses and earn both undergraduate credit and graduate credit simultaneously.  Students need to consult with the graduate coordinator to ensure grade credit could be applied to a program of study for the graduate degree.  Application to this program may be made when the student has completed 75 hours of graded coursework toward the completion of a B.S. degree in an engineering discipline.  Students interested in applying to the Accelerated Program should contact the department's Graduate Coordinator for more details.

At the time a student applies to the program, the student must:

  1. be enrolled at Mississippi State University in one of the eight Bagley College of Engineering programs;
  2. have earned at least 75 hours toward their respective degree; and
  3. have an overall cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.50.

An application package consists of the following items which must be submitted to the Graduate Coordinator of the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department.

  1. Application form (NOTE: Students wishing to pursue a thesis in their M.S. program must have the support of an advisor prior to applying for the program.)
  2. One-page résumé
  3. Contact information for three references (included on the application form).  Ideal references are those who are knowledgeable about the academic abilities of the applicant.  the department will contact these references to gather additional information as needed to determine the acceptability of the study into the program.

The Industrial and Systems Engineering Graduate committee will review applications three times a year to assess whether students possess those qualifications and interests that are indicative of successful completion of the Industrial and Systems Engineering M.S. program.

For students enrolled in an Accelerated Program, the MSU Graduate Council has established the following guidelines in cooperation with the Registrar's Office.

Once the student is accepted into the Accelerated Program, the student and the advisor may select up to 9 hours that will satisfy both undergraduate and graduate requirements.  these courses may be split-level (i.e. split 4000-6000 level) or 8000-level classes.  The student should take the courses for graduate credit (i.e., 6000-level or higher).  The combination of undergraduate and graduate credit hours may not exceed 13 within a semester.

The student should use the Undergraduate Enrollment in Accelerated Degree Program form to (i) receive from the Office of the Graduate School a level override that enables the student to enroll in the graduate course(s) and (ii) activate a process with the Registrar's Office to obtain both undergraduate and graduate credit for the course.  After successfully completing the graduate-level class(es), the Registrar will grant credit for the undergraduate course and give the same grade as received for the graduate course.  For the case of a split-level class, the transcript will show credit for both 4000- and 6000-level on the transcript.  In the case of an 8000-level class, a special topics undergraduate course of the same title will be entered on the transcript to allow dual credit.

Students are permitted to opt out of the Accelerated Program at any time, at which point they could complete only the undergraduate portion of the program.  No additional dual counting of courses would occur after the students opt out of the Accelerated Program.

Students are expected to apply to the graduate degree program during the last semester in which they are enrolled in the Bachelor's program.  Application to the graduate degree program would be made through the standard application process via the Office of the Graduate School.  Students will received the Bachelor's degree once the requirements for the Bachelor's degree are met.  Students will be required to complete all of the requirements for both the bachelor's and graduate degrees in order to receive both degrees and those requirements will be identical to the requirements for students enrolled in traditional bachelor's and graduate degree programs.  Students will be classified as undergraduates until they fulfill all the requirements for the undergraduate degree.  At that time, upon admission to graduate school, they will be classified as graduate students and will be subject to all the guidelines pertaining to the graduate degree.

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering leading to Master of Business Administration-Project Management

The second program encourages undergraduate students in Industrial Engineering to work toward a Master of Business Administration-Project Management degree.  This Accelerated Program permits the students to earn up to 9 hours of graduate level coursework during their undergraduate industrial engineering coursework.  These 9 hours are taken as graduate-level courses and earn both undergraduate credit (toward B.S.I.E. completion) and graduate credit (toward M.B.A.-P.M. completion) simultaneously.  The Accelerated Program allows students to complete three foundational courses in the M.B.A.-P.M.program while still pursuing their B.S.I.E.  The courses approved for the Accelerated Program are IE 6333 (Production Control 1), IE 6533 (Project Management), and IE 6653 (Industrial Quality Control 1).  Junior and senior industrial engineering students with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher are eligible to apply.  Students interested in applying to the B.S.I.E./M.B.A.-P.M. Accelerated Program should contact Dr. Lesley Strawderman, ISE Undergraduate Coordinator.  Ms. Angelia Knight is Director of the MBA programs in the College of Business.  

Admission requirements include the following.

  • A GPA of 3.50/4.00 for all undergraduate work
  • A minimum of 60 hours towards the bachelor's degree
  • Completed application available from the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
  • Résumé

For students enrolled in an Accelerated Program, the MSU Graduate Council has established the following guidelines in cooperation with the Registrar's Office.

Once the student is accepted into the Accelerated Program, the student and the advisor may select up to 9 hours that will satisfy both undergraduate and graduate requirements.  These courses may be split-level (i.e. split 4000-6000 level) or 8000-level classes.  The student should take the courses for graduate credit (i.e., 6000-level or higher).  The combination of undergraduate and graduate credit hours may not exceed 13 within a semester.

The student should use the Undergraduate Enrollment in Accelerated Degree Program form to (i) receive from the Graduate School a level override that enables the student to enroll in the graduate course(s) and (ii) activate a process with the Registrar's Office to obtain both undergraduate and graduate credit for the course.  After successfully completing the graduate-level class(es), the Registrar will grant credit for the undergraduate course and give the same grade as received for the graduate course.  For the case of a split-level class, the transcript will show credit for both 4000- and 6000-level on the transcript.  In the case of an 8000-level class, a special topics undergraduate course of the same title will be entered on the transcript to allow dual credit.

Students are permitted to opt out of the Accelerated Program at any time, at which point they could complete only the undergraduate portion of the program.  No additional dual counting of courses would occur after the students opt out of the Accelerated Program.

Students are expected to apply to the MBA degree program during in their senior year through the standard application process via the Graduate School.  Students will received the bachelor's degree once the requirements for the bachelor's degree are met.  Students will be required to complete all of the requirements for both the bachelor's and graduate degrees in order to receive both degrees and those requirements will be identical to the requirements for students enrolled in traditional bachelor's and grade degree programs.  Students will be classified as undergraduates until they fulfill all the requirements for the undergraduate degree.  At that time, upon admission to graduate school, they will be classified as graduate students and will be subject to all the guidelines pertaining to the graduate degree.

Admission Criteria

Typically, an entering M.S. student should have a grade point average of 3.00 out of 4.00 for the junior and senior years.  Likewise, an entering Ph.D. student with an M.S. degree should have a 3.50 out of 4.00 grade point average on the M.S. work, while a Ph.D. student entering with only a B.S. degree is expected to have a 3.50 out of 4.00 on the last two years of the undergraduate program.  A student with a lower GPA may still be eligible for admission based on outstanding qualifications in other areas.  All entering students must submit GRE general-test scores.  International students must have a minimum TOEFL score of 550 PBT (79 iBT) or IELTS score of 6.5.

The department reviews completed applications four times a year: February 15, May 15, August 15, and November 15.  Incomplete or not fully processed applications will be reviewed during the next cycle.

Provisional Admission

An applicant who has not fully met the GPA requirement stipulated by the University may be admitted on a provisional basis. The provisionally-admitted student is eligible for a change to regular status after receiving a 3.00 GPA on the first 9 hours of graduate courses at Mississippi State University (with no grade lower than a C). The first 9 hours of graduate courses must be within the student's Program of Study.  Courses with an S grade, transfer credits, or credits earned while in Unclassified status cannot be used to satisfy this requirement.  If a 3.00 is not attained, the provisional student shall be dismissed from the graduate program.  Academic departments may set higher standards for students to fulfill provisional requirements; a student admitted with provisional status should contact the graduate coordinator for the program’s specific requirements.  While in the provisional status, a student is not eligible to hold a graduate assistantship.

Academic Performance

In addition to the criteria defined in the current Bulletin of the Graduate School, unsatisfactory performance in the graduate program in Industrial and Systems Engineering is defined as any of the following.

  • Failure to maintain a 3.00 average in the M.S. program or 3.30 in the Ph.D. program,
  • Failure of the qualifying exam (Ph.D. students only),
  • Failure of the preliminary exam (Ph.D. students only);
  • Failure of the comprehensive final exam (M.S. non-thesis option only),
  • Unsatisfactory evaluation of thesis or dissertation, or
  • A failure of the required component of the program of study. 

Any one of these will constitute the basis for review for possible dismissal.  If the students drops six or more quality points below the required average (3.00 for M.S. or 3.30 for Ph.D.), the graduate coordinator will review the record along with the student’s graduate committee and will recommend a final course of action, which will be immediate dismissal or the establishment of a probationary period in which corrective action must take place.

While on probation, the student is not eligible to receive an assistantship and is required to raise his/her cumulative GPA to 3.00 for M.S. or 3.30 for Ph.D. by the end of the following semester of enrollment.  During that semester, the student must enroll in 9 credit hours of coursework; Directed Individual Study courses are excluded.

In case of a dismissal from the graduate program, a student may appeal his/her academic dismissal according to the following procedure.

  • Within four weeks of being notified of the official dismissal, the student must present the request and related explanation in writing to the graduate coordinator.  The graduate coordinator will review the appeal with the appropriate departmental committee and render a recommendation.
  • If the appeal at the departmental level is unsuccessful, a student may then appeal to the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies in the college.
  • If the appeal at the college level is unsuccessful, the student may then appeal to the Office of the Provost.

Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial & Systems Engineering

Industrial Engineering courses30
Courses in discipline other than Industrial Engineering6
IE 6623Engineering Statistics II (or equivalent)3
IE 6773Systems Simulation I (or equivalent)3
Additional Graduate-level coursework6
Research20
Total Hours68

 A preliminary examination, a dissertation, and an oral examination in defense of the dissertation are required.

Additional requirements are:

  1. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program
  2. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  3. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

Doctoral students must complete at least 48 hours of coursework beyond the B.S. level.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Human Factors and Erognomics Concentration (HFE) - Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • MA 1713
  • MA 1723
  • MA 2733
  • MA 2743
  • IE 3123
  • IE 4613/6613
IE 6773Systems Simulation I3
IE 6623Engineering Statistics II3
At least 3 HFE ISE courses9
IE 8000Thesis Research/ Thesis in Industrial Engineering6
At least one non-HFE ISE course3
At least one course from Mathematics (MA) or Statistics (ST)3
At least one course from a supporting area (Biological Engineering [ABE], Psychology [PSY], Kinesiology [KI], Mechanical Engineering [ME], Mathematics [MA], Statistics [ST], etc.)3
Total Hours30

A thesis and an oral comprehensive examination in defense of the thesis are required.

Additional requirements are:

  1. A minimum of 12 hours coursework must be at the 8000-level or higher.
  2. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program
  3. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  4. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The thesis-option Master of Science in Industrial Engineering requires at least 24 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.   IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Human Factors and Ergonomics Concentration (HFE) - Non-Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • MA 1713
  • MA 1723
  • MA 2733
  • MA 2743
  • IE 3123
  • IE 4613/6613
IE 6773Systems Simulation I3
IE 6623Engineering Statistics II3
At least three HFE ISE courses9
At least two non-HFE ISE courses6
At least two courses from Mathematics (MA) or Statistics (ST)6
At least one course from a supporting area (Biological Engineering [ABE], Psychology [PSY], Kinesiology [KI], Mechanical Engineering [ME], Mathematics [MA], Statistics [ST], etc.)3
Course to be selected by the academic advisor and graduate program committee3
Total Hours33

A written and oral comprehensive final exam on the coursework.  At least 15 hours for the M.S. non-thesis degree must be from 8000-level courses or above.  The specific courses required depend upon the student’s area of concentration.  IE 8000 Research/Thesis does not apply to non-thesis students.

Additional requirements are:

  1. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program.
  2. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum.  
  3. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The non-thesis Master of Science requires at least 33 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.   IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Industrial Systems Concentration (SYS) - Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • MA 1713
  • MA 1723
  • MA 2733
  • MA 2743
  • Computer programming proficiency
  • IE 3123
  • IE 3913
  • IE 4333
  • IE 4613/6613
IE 6773Systems Simulation I3
IE 8000Thesis Research/ Thesis in Industrial Engineering6
All other courses to be selected by the student along with the academic advisor and graduate program committee21
Total Hours30

A thesis and an oral comprehensive examination in defense of the thesis are required.

Additional requirements are:

  1. A minimum of 12 hours coursework must be at the 8000-level or higher.
  2. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program
  3. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  4. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The thesis-option Master of Science in Industrial Engineering requires at least 24 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.   IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Industrial Systems Concentration (SYS) - Non-Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • MA 1713
  • MA 1723
  • MA 2733
  • MA 2743
  • Computer programming proficiency
  • IE 3123
  • IE 3913
  • IE 4333
  • IE 4613/6613
At least 15 hours of 8000-level courses selected by the student along with the academic advisor and grade program committee.15
Other courses to be selected by the student along with the academic advisor and grade program committee.18
Total Hours33

A written and oral comprehensive final exam on the coursework.  At least 15 hours for the M.S. non-thesis degree must be from 8000-level courses or above.  The specific courses required depend upon the student’s area of concentration.  IE 8000 Research/Thesis does not apply to  non-thesis students.

Additional requirements are:

  1. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program.  
  2. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  3. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The non-thesis Master of Science requires at least 33 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.   IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Management Systems Engineering Concentration (MGTS) - Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • B.S. in engineering from an ABET-accredited program or permission from the MSE Technical Committee
  • IE 3913
  • IE 4613/6613
IE 6513Engineering Administration3
IE 6533Project Management3
IE 6573Process Improvement Engineering3
IE 8583Enterprise Systems Engineering3
IE 8913Engineering Economy II3
IE 8000Thesis Research/ Thesis in Industrial Engineering6
At least two non-MSE ISE courses6
Course to be selected by the student along with academic advisor and graduate program committee3
Total Hours30

A thesis and an oral comprehensive examination in defense of the thesis are required.

Additional requirements are:

  1. A minimum of 12 hours at the 8000-level is required.
  2. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program
  3. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  4. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The thesis-option Master of Science in Industrial Engineering requires at least 24 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.   IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Management Systems Engineering Concentration (MGTS) - Non-Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • B.S. in engineering from an ABET-accedited program or permission from the MSE Technical Committee
  • IE 3913
  • IE 4613/6613
IE 6513Engineering Administration3
IE 6533Project Management3
IE 6573Process Improvement Engineering3
IE 8583Enterprise Systems Engineering3
IE 8913Engineering Economy II3
At least two non-MSE ISE courses6
Other courses to be selected by the student along with the academic advisor and graduate program committee12
Total Hours33

A written and oral comprehensive final exam on the coursework.  At least 15 hours for the M.S. non-thesis degree must be from 8000-level courses or above.  The specific courses required depend upon the student’s area of concentration.  IE 8000 Research/Thesis does not apply to non-thesis students.

Additional requirements are:

  1. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program
  2. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  3. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The non-thesis Master of Science requires at least 33 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.   IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Manufacturing Systems Concentration (MFGS) - Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • B.S. in engineering from an ABET-accredited program or permission from the Manufacturing Systems Technical Committee
  • Computer programming proficiency
  • IE 4333/6333
  • IE 4613/6613
IE 6653Industrial Quality Control3
IE 8333Production Control Systems II3
IE 8353Manufacturing Systems Modeling3
IE 8000Thesis Research/ Thesis in Industrial Engineering6
At least two Manufacturing Systems ISE courses6
At least two non-Manufacturing Systems ISE courses6
Course to be selected by the student along with the academic advisor and graduate program committee3
Total Hours30

A thesis and an oral comprehensive examination in defense of the thesis are required.

Additional requirements are:

  1. A minimum of 12 hours coursework must be at the 8000-level or higher.
  2. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program
  3. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  4. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The thesis-option Master of Science in Industrial Engineering requires at least 24 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.   IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Manufacturing Systems Concentration (MFGS) - Non-Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • B.S. in engineering from an ABET-accredited program or permission from the Manufacturing Systems Technical Committee
  • Computer programming proficiency
  • IE 4333/6333
  • IE 4613/6613
IE 6653Industrial Quality Control3
IE 8333Production Control Systems II3
IE 8353Manufacturing Systems Modeling3
At least two Manufacturing Systems ISE courses6
At least two non-Manufacturing Systems ISE courses6
Other courses to be selected by the student along with the academic advisor and graduate program committee12
Total Hours33

A written and oral comprehensive final exam on the coursework.  At least 15 hours for the M.S. non-thesis degree must be from 8000-level courses or above.  The specific courses required depend upon the student’s area of concentration.  IE 8000 Research/Thesis does not apply to non-thesis students.   IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Additional requirements are:

  1. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program
  2. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  3. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The non-thesis Master of Science requires at least 33 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Operations Research Concentration (OPRS) - Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • MA 1713
  • MA 1723
  • MA 2733
  • MA 2743
  • Computer programming proficiency
  • IE 4613/6613
IE 6733Linear Programming3
IE 6773Systems Simulation I3
IE 8000Thesis Research/ Thesis in Industrial Engineering6
At least two OR ISE ccourses6
At least two non-OR ISE courses6
At least one course from Computer Science (CSE), Mathematics (MA), or Statistics (ST)3
Course to be selected by the student along with the academic advisor and graduate program committee3
Total Hours30

A thesis and an oral comprehensive examination in defense of the thesis are required.

Additional requirements are:

  1. A minimum of 12 hours coursework must be at the 8000-level or higher.
  2. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program
  3. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  4. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The thesis-option Master of Science in Industrial Engineering requires at least 24 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.   IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering with Operations Research Concentration (OPRS) - Non-Thesis

Prerequisites (foundational courses) are:

  • MA 1713
  • MA 1723
  • MA 2733
  • MA 2743
  • Computer programming proficiency
  • IE 4613/6613
IE 6733Linear Programming3
IE 6773Systems Simulation I3
At least two Operations Research ISE courses6
At least two non-Operations Research ISE courses6
At least one course com Computer Science (CSE), Mathematics (MA), or Statistics (ST)3
Courses to be selected by the student along with the academic advisor and graduate program committee12
Total Hours33

A written and oral comprehensive final exam on the coursework.  At least 15 hours for the M.S. non-thesis degree must be from 8000-level courses or above.  The specific courses required depend upon the student’s area of concentration.  IE 8000 Research/Thesis does not apply to non-thesis students.  IE 9000 does not apply to M.S. students.

Additional requirements are:

  1. No ISE graduate student may list ST 8114 or IE 6613 on his/her graduate program
  2. No program can contain more than 9 hours of courses that are required in the bachelor’s degree curriculum
  3. No program can contain more than 6 hours of Directed Individual Study (IE 7000).

The non-thesis Master of Science requires at least 33 credit hours of coursework above the baccalaureate degree.

IE 6113 Human Factors Engineering: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing in engineering). Two hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. Human capabilities and limitations affecting communications and responses in man-machine systems. Emphasis on physiological and psychological fundamentals

IE 6123 Psychology of Human-Computer Interaction: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: PSY 3713 or CS 4663/6663 or IE 4113/6113 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Exploration of psychological factors that interact with computer interface usability. Interface design techniques and usability evaluation methods are emphasized. (Same as CS 4673/6673 and PSY 4743/6743)

IE 6173 Occupational Safety Engineering: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing). Three hours lecture. Causes and prevention of industrial accidents. Analysis of hazardous processes and materials. Design of occupational safety systems and programs

IE 6193 Automotive Engineering: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Fundamentals of automotive engineering including power units, mechanical systems, electrical systems and industrial and systems engineering aspects. (Same as CHE/ECE/ME 4193/6193 )

IE 6333 Production Control Systems I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in IE 4613). Three hours lecture. Principles, analysis, and design of production and inventory planning and control. Demand for forecasting, aggregated planning, inventory management , production scheduling and control systems

IE 6353 Materials Handling: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing). Three hour lecture. Analysis and design of materials handling systems and components. Introduction to facilities design

IE 6373 Automation: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. Introduction to the various technologies used in both design and manufacturing automation

IE 6513 Engineering Administration: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior or graduate standing in engineering). Three hours lecture. Study of problems confronting the engineering manager. Includes: Organization and communication theory, internal and external relationships and responsibilities, and designing and implementing managerial systems

IE 6533 Project Management: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in IE 4613). Three hours lecture. Use of CPM, PERT, and GERT for planning, managing and controlling projects. Computer procedures for complex networks

IE 6543 Logistics Engineering: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: IE 4613 and senior or graduate standing, Co-requisites: IE 4733 or MA 4733). Three hours lecture. Analysis of complex logistics networks. Integration of supply, production, inventory, transportation, and distribution. Strategies for reducing logistics costs and lead times. Customer-supplier partnerships

IE 6553 Engineering Law and Ethics: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing in engineering). Three hours lecture. The engineer and his relations to the law, to the public, and the ethics of his profession. Includes contracts, patents, copyrights, sales agreements, engineering specifications

IE 6573 Process Improvement Engineering: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Introduction to quality and productivity improvement methodologies and tools. The design and implementation of continuous improvement systems in organizations

IE 6613 Engineering Statistics I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: MA 1723). Three hours lecture. Introduction to statistical analysis. Topics include: probability, probability distributions, data analysis, parameter estimation, statistical intervals, and statistical inferences

IE 6623 Engineering Statistics II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in IE 4613). Three hours lecture. Continuation of IE 4613/6613. Introduction to engineering applications of regression, experimental design and analysis, and nonparametric methods

IE 6653 Industrial Quality Control: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: IE 4613). Three hours lecture. The theory and application of statistical quality control; statistical process control; and statistical acceptance sampling

IE 6673 Reliability Engineering: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: IE 4613 ). Three hours lecture. Probability functions and statistical methods for component life testing and system reliability prediction. System availability and maintainability. Redundancy in time-dependent and time-independent situations

IE 6713 Operations Research I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: IE 4613). Mathematical techniques of decision making, queuing, networks, simulation and dynamic programming

IE 6733 Linear Programming: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: MA 3113).Three hours lecture.Theory and application of linear programming;simplex algorithm, revised simplex algorithm,duality and sensitivity analysis,transportation and assignment problems algorithms, integer and goal programming. (Same as MA 4733/6733)

IE 6743 Engineering Design Optimization: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Introduction to optimality criteria and optimization techniques for solving constrained or unconstrained optimization problems. Sensitivity analysis and approximation. Computer application in optimization. Introduction to MDO. ( Same as ASE 4553/6553 and EM 4143/6143 )

IE 6753 Systems Engineering and Analysis: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in IE 3913 and IE 4613). Three hours lecture. Systems concepts, methodologies, models and tools for analyzing, designing, and improving new and existing human-made systems

IE 6773 Systems Simulation I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in IE 4934 or equivalent programming course, Co-requisite: IE 4623). Three hours lecture. The principles of simulating stochastic systems with an emphasis on the statistics of simulation and the use of discrete-event simulation languages

IE 6923 Six Sigma Methods and Project: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: IE 4623/6623, IE 4653/6653) One hour lecture Four hours laboratory. Introduction of six sigma and problem solving methodologies. Application of learned methodologies in selecting, performing, and completing a process involvement project

IE 6934 Information Systems for Industrial Engineering: 4 hours.

Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. An introduction to the design and development of information systems for use in industrial engineering applications

IE 6990 Special Topics in Industrial and Systems Engineering: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

IE 7000 Directed Individual Study in Industrial and Systems Engineering: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

IE 8000 Thesis Research/ Thesis in Industrial Engineering: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

IE 8143 Applied Ergonomics Methods: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Provide practical usage and theoretical background of select tools for ergonomic evaluation of workers and work places, tasks, and environments using real world scenarios

IE 8153 Cognitive Engineering: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Implications of human perceputal, cognitive, and psycho-motor capabilities on the design of systems for effective, efficient and safe human-machine performance

IE 8163 Macroergonomics: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Provides a foundational review of Macrergonomics, examining the personnel, technolgical, and environmental factors influencing organizations. Addresses the relationship between macro- and micro- ergonomics

IE 8333 Production Control Systems II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: IE 4333 ). Three hours lecture. Inventory systems, static and dynamic production planning, operations scheduling and forecasting systems

IE 8353 Manufacturing Systems Modeling: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: IE 4733 and IE 4773). Three hours lecture. A study of models used to describe and analyze manufacturing systems. Development of models using queuing networks, mathematical programming, simulation, and other techniques

IE 8583 Enterprise Systems Engineering: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Focuses on the design and improvement of an enterprise through the use of engineering tools and methods, based on the systems perspective of industrial engineering

IE 8723 Operations Research II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: IE 4713). Problem formulation, general inventory theory, restricted inventory models. Markovian and queuing processes, sequencing and coordination, game theory, search problems

IE 8733 Decision Theory: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: IE 4613). Three hours lecture. A quantitative development of the decision making process. Criteria for decision making. Treatment of risk under uncertainty and in conflict situations

IE 8743 Nonlinear Programming I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: IE 4733 or MA 4733). Three hours lecture. Optimization of nonlinear functions; quadratic programming, gradient methods, integer programming; Lagrange multipliers and Kuhn-Tucker theory

IE 8753 Network Flows and Dynamic Programming: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites:MA 2733 and IE 4613).Three hours lecture. Applications of network optimization problems and simplex algorithm;and dynamic programming to industrial/ management problems. Study of serial/non-serial multistage deterministic and stochastic systems. Principles of optimality

IE 8763 Stochastic Programming: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. An introduction to stochastic optimization, focusing on stochastic programming. Covers applications of stochastic modeling and formulation, important properties of stochastic programs, and solution methods such as decomposition, Monte Carlo methods, and approximation methods

IE 8773 Systems Simulation II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: IE 4773/6773 ). Three hours lecture. Continuation of IE 4773. Includes: Advanced theory and practice of simulation, the statistics of simulation, simulation languages, and continuous simulations

IE 8793 Heuristics in Optimization: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A study of heuristic methods and their applications to optimization problems

IE 8913 Engineering Economy II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: IE 3913 and IE 4613). Three hours lecture. Advanced principles and methods for engineering analysis of industrial problems. Topics include criteria for decisions, project investment and analysis, and elements of risk and uncertainty

IE 8990 Special Topics in Industrial and Systems Engineering: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

IE 9000 Dissertation Research /Dissertation in Industrial Engineering: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged